Cover image for Five creatures
Title:
Five creatures
Author:
Jenkins, Emily, 1967-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
[Weston, Conn.] : Weston Woods ; [New York] : Scholastic, 2002.
Physical Description:
1 audiocassette : analog. + 1 book (1 volumes (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 29 cm.).
Summary:
In words and pictures, a girl describes the three humans and two cats that live in her house, and details some of the traits that they share.
General Note:
Side 1 includes page-turn signals; side 2 has interrupted reading.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
AD 130 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 1.6 0.5 48640.

Reading Counts RC K-2 1.9 1 Quiz: 25197 Guided reading level: NR.
ISBN:
9781555928278

9780374323417
Format :
Sound Cassette

Sound Recording

Available:*

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Summary

Summary

Three humans and two catsFive creatures live in our house. Three humans, and two cats. Three short, and two tall. Four grownups, and one child (that's me!). In this book of lighthearted comparisons, simple text and warm pictures work together to depict various scenes in a happy household where each member is distinct but also has something inn common with one or more of the others. The fun comes from sorting out the similarities and the differences.


Summary

Three humans and two cats

Five creatures live in our house.
Three humans, and two cats.
Three short, and two tall.
Four grownups, and one child (that's me!).

In this book of lighthearted comparisons, simple text and warm pictures work together to depict various scenes in a happy household where each member is distinct but also has something inn common with one or more of the others. The fun comes from sorting out the similarities and the differences.   Five Creatures is a 2001 Boston Globe - Horn Book Award Honor Book for Picture Books.


Author Notes

Emily Jenkins and Tomek Bogacki have also collaborated on Daffodil . Both author and illustrator live in New York City.


Reviews 6

Booklist Review

Ages 3^-5. This clever, multilayered book is as much for sharing and getting little ones on the path to deductive reasoning as it is for reading. That makes it sound heavyhanded; it's anything but. Five creatures live in the house of the young narrator. The text encourages readers to be observant. It notes that three characters have orange hair. Which ones are they? Mom, daughter, and one cat; the two with gray hair are dad, and cat number two. Each of the spreads, many of which employ an almost aerial perspective, offers some new insight into the configuration of the family, often something funny and unexpected. For instance, who can open cupboards? The adults and the cats. The cats and the little girl climb trees. Then there's the great spread that shows everyone loves birds, "but not all in the same way." Bogacki's colored chalk art, a bit reminiscent of Douglas Florian's work, is childlike in the best possible way--immediate, identifiable, and executed with soft colors and simple shapes. Parents and teachers will find lots of ways to use this--along with just enjoying it. --Ilene Cooper


Publisher's Weekly Review

Three people and two cats form a cozy quintet in this volume, in which Jenkins (The Secret Life of Billie's Uncle Myron) playfully appraises a family's varied talents and tastes just the way a child learning to count might do. A girl, the diminutive version of her red-haired mother, does the accounting. She notices that of the "five creatures" in her family, there are "Four who like to eat fish.... Two who like to eat mice. Only one who likes to eat beets." A dinnertime image reveals each individual's preferences; purple vegetables fill the narrator's white plate, while the cats monitor a telltale hole in the wall. Round-the-clock glimpses of the household show "One who sings loud late at night" (a charcoal-gray cat in a moonlit window) and "one who sings in the morning" (the girl's father, standing over the sink in his striped pajamas). When her father falls asleep on the couch with the cats, the girl lists "Three who nap with the Sunday newspaper." She sits nearby, imitating her bookworm mother by flipping through a picture book: "Two who can read, and one who is learning." Bogacki (The Bird, the Monkey, and the Snake in the Jungle) suggests contentment with a subdued palette of autumn orange, sea green and creamy, pale yellow. His tranquil illustrations provide clues to Jenkins's narrative, which encourages deductive reasoning. Jenkins smoothly weaves logical analysis into a narrative that exudes warmth, and the book concludes with a gentle scene of togetherness: "Five who sit together in the evening by the fire." Ages 3-6. (Apr.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 1-3-A lighthearted look at a family from different viewpoints. The five members of the household, both human and feline, share many traits with one another while maintaining their individuality. The narrator (and only child in the group) sorts the five by their various commonalities from hair color to leisure activities to food preferences. "Three who like to hide in boxes./Four who have a knack with yarn." Although the illustrations in pastel colors seem a little lackluster at first, readers will be drawn in by their soft, gentle flow from scene to scene and the portrait they combine to create of a warm and loving family. Primary-grade teachers will find this a wonderful accompaniment when teaching grouping and Venn diagrams as it will allow them to assist students in making real-life connections to mathematical concepts. Children will simply enjoy it for the good story that it is.-Sheryl L. Shipley, North Central Local Schools, Pioneer, OH (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Ages 3^-5. This clever, multilayered book is as much for sharing and getting little ones on the path to deductive reasoning as it is for reading. That makes it sound heavyhanded; it's anything but. Five creatures live in the house of the young narrator. The text encourages readers to be observant. It notes that three characters have orange hair. Which ones are they? Mom, daughter, and one cat; the two with gray hair are dad, and cat number two. Each of the spreads, many of which employ an almost aerial perspective, offers some new insight into the configuration of the family, often something funny and unexpected. For instance, who can open cupboards? The adults and the cats. The cats and the little girl climb trees. Then there's the great spread that shows everyone loves birds, "but not all in the same way." Bogacki's colored chalk art, a bit reminiscent of Douglas Florian's work, is childlike in the best possible way--immediate, identifiable, and executed with soft colors and simple shapes. Parents and teachers will find lots of ways to use this--along with just enjoying it. --Ilene Cooper


Publisher's Weekly Review

Three people and two cats form a cozy quintet in this volume, in which Jenkins (The Secret Life of Billie's Uncle Myron) playfully appraises a family's varied talents and tastes just the way a child learning to count might do. A girl, the diminutive version of her red-haired mother, does the accounting. She notices that of the "five creatures" in her family, there are "Four who like to eat fish.... Two who like to eat mice. Only one who likes to eat beets." A dinnertime image reveals each individual's preferences; purple vegetables fill the narrator's white plate, while the cats monitor a telltale hole in the wall. Round-the-clock glimpses of the household show "One who sings loud late at night" (a charcoal-gray cat in a moonlit window) and "one who sings in the morning" (the girl's father, standing over the sink in his striped pajamas). When her father falls asleep on the couch with the cats, the girl lists "Three who nap with the Sunday newspaper." She sits nearby, imitating her bookworm mother by flipping through a picture book: "Two who can read, and one who is learning." Bogacki (The Bird, the Monkey, and the Snake in the Jungle) suggests contentment with a subdued palette of autumn orange, sea green and creamy, pale yellow. His tranquil illustrations provide clues to Jenkins's narrative, which encourages deductive reasoning. Jenkins smoothly weaves logical analysis into a narrative that exudes warmth, and the book concludes with a gentle scene of togetherness: "Five who sit together in the evening by the fire." Ages 3-6. (Apr.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 1-3-A lighthearted look at a family from different viewpoints. The five members of the household, both human and feline, share many traits with one another while maintaining their individuality. The narrator (and only child in the group) sorts the five by their various commonalities from hair color to leisure activities to food preferences. "Three who like to hide in boxes./Four who have a knack with yarn." Although the illustrations in pastel colors seem a little lackluster at first, readers will be drawn in by their soft, gentle flow from scene to scene and the portrait they combine to create of a warm and loving family. Primary-grade teachers will find this a wonderful accompaniment when teaching grouping and Venn diagrams as it will allow them to assist students in making real-life connections to mathematical concepts. Children will simply enjoy it for the good story that it is.-Sheryl L. Shipley, North Central Local Schools, Pioneer, OH (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.