Cover image for Where fish go in winter : and other great mysteries
Title:
Where fish go in winter : and other great mysteries
Author:
Koss, Amy Goldman, 1954-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Dial Books for young Readers, [2002]

©2002
Physical Description:
32 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
Summary:
A collection of poems that answer such questions as "Where do fish go in winter?" and "Why does popcorn pop?"
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 4.1 0.5 65676.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780803727045

9780142300381
Format :
Book

Available:*

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Q163 .K67 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Readers
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Q163 .K67 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Q163 .K67 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Childrens Area-Readers
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Q163 .K67 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Q163 .K67 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Q163 .K67 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Q163 .K67 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Q163 .K67 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Q163 .K67 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Readers
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Q163 .K67 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Q163 .K67 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Q163 .K67 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Readers
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Q163 .K67 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Q163 .K67 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Q163 .K67 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Why does popcorn pop? How do cats purr? Do islands float? What do clouds feel like? These are a few of the questions about the natural world that are asked and cleverly answered in this easy-to-read book. Written in rhyming poems that manage to be funny as well as informative, and illustrated with friendly, accessible illustrations, Where Fish Go in Wintermakes learning fun.


Author Notes

Amy Goldman Koss is a children's writer who attended Lansing Community College and Wayne State University but did not finish her degree. As an adult, she lived in several places such as - Lansing, Boston, Stuart, Florida - working odd jobs and taking random college classes. She soon started submitting her drawings and writings to newspapers and literary magazines. When her first picture book got published, she was totally hooked and spent the next few years writing and illustrating picture books in verse. After having her children she started writing novels and has been doing it ever since. Her titles include Gossip Times Three, How I Saved Hanukkah, and Smoke Screen.

She belongs to several writing societies such as Society of Children's Book Writers and Illustrators, Children's Author's Network and Friend's of Children and Literature Authors Guild.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

PreS^-Gr. 2. It's hard to explain such things as how a cat purrs and why onions make people cry in straightforward easy-reader language, but Koss manages to pull it off--in rhyme. And not just singsongy doggerel (although there is a rather repetitious rhyme scheme). The text does quite well at painting vivid word pictures: "Their belly muscles flutter / When people pet their coats. / The flutters send small puffs of air / Up to the kitties' throats." Other topics covered include why popcorn pops, why spiders stick to their own webs, and why islands float. The richly colored illustrations are very nice; no slapdash quality to the art here. This entry in the Dial Easy-to-Read series will be fun to read alone and will work well in the classroom. --Ilene Cooper


School Library Journal Review

Gr 1-3-In 14 poems of 3 to 7 quatrains, Koss attempts simple explanations of natural phenomena ("Why do leaves change colors?"; "How do cats purr?"; "How do birds fly?"; "What is the Man in the Moon?"). While the questions will hold appeal for newly independent readers, the author's emphasis on end rhyme often pulls attention away from the poem's content and results in a cursory explanation rather than the sort of detailed description that would satisfy a young audience. Some of the vocabulary is too sophisticated for the intended age group. ("Gravity sensors/Within each young root/Teach it to follow/A straight downward route.") Attractive, brightly colored two-page paintings show the subject of the poem in its natural setting. Oddly, all of the people, animals, plants, and natural objects inside are softly detailed realistic/impressionist, but the pictures for the fish featured on the cover and in the title poem are cartoons. While a few of the poems do work, most lack both informational and poetic quality.-Susan Scheps, Shaker Heights Public Library, OH (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.