Cover image for Life on earth the story of evolution
Title:
Life on earth the story of evolution
Author:
Jenkins, Steve, 1952-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Boston : Houghton Mifflin, 2002.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 30 cm
Summary:
Provides an overview of the origin and evolution of life on earth and of what has been learned from the study of evolution.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
810 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 5.5 0.5 60314.

Reading Counts RC 3-5 5.3 3 Quiz: 32759 Guided reading level: S.
Electronic Access:
Publisher description http://www.loc.gov/catdir/description/hm022/2002000472.html
ISBN:
9780618164769
Format :
Book

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QH367.1 .J46 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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QH367.1 .J46 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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QH367.1 .J46 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Childrens Area
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On Order

Summary

Summary

There are millions of different kinds of plants and animals living on the earth. Many millions more lived here in the past. Where did they all come from? Why have some become extinct and others lived on?

In this remarkable book for children, Steve Jenkins explores the fascinating history of life on earth and the awe-inspiring story of evolution, Charles Darwin's great contribution to modern science.


Author Notes

Steve Jenkins has written and illustrated many nonfiction picture books for young readers, including the Caldecott Honor-winning What Do You Do with a Tail Like This? His books have been called stunning, eye-popping, inventive, gorgeous, masterful, extraordinary, playful, irresistible, compelling, engaging, accessible, glorious, and informative. He lives in Boulder, Colorado with his wife and frequent collaborator, Robin Page.
www.stevejenkinsbooks.com


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Gr. 3^-6. It's tough to get children to imagine a world without television, let alone one without life, but this oversize picture book for older readers makes the overwhelming concept easier to grasp. The main text, in large type, outlines evolution in simple, clear terms: the principal theory of how life began, Darwin's contribution, how mutation and even extinction have contributed. Jenkins' paper-cut spot art, with captions in small type, provides most of the specifics. There's no sense of scale in his pictures; the bee and the rabbit are the same size. But his paper cuts are extraordinary all the same, jam-packed with pattern and variegated color. Some of the art is just flashy and gorgeous: a double-page spread filled to the edges with animals and plants (there's an identification key at the back); a spectacular spread showing 19 of the 300,000 beetle species. Other pictures greatly extend the text--among them, a full page comprising small coordinated pictures that dramatize the natural selection of frogs. But the last double-page spread is, perhaps, the best. Jenkins makes the history of evolution even more accessible by placing important events on a time-line ribbon that represents a 24-hour day. Clever, eye-catching, and extremely effective. --Stephanie Zvirin


Publisher's Weekly Review

Grabbing the audience's attention with stunning cut- and torn-paper collage illustrations, Jenkins (The Top of the World) illuminates another corner of the science world in this cogent introduction to evolution. Here, he traces the planet's history from its fiery beginnings billions of years ago through the emergence of the first bacteria, development of such organisms as jellyfish, ferns, dinosaurs, mammals and birds, on up to humans. Posing and answering questions ("Why have so many different forms of life developed on the earth?"), Jenkins ably presents such concepts as mutation, extinction and Darwin's theory of "survival of the fittest." The information spans an impressive range; Jenkins organizes and presents it with a clarity that demonstrates his mindfulness of the audience. Spacious white backdrops allow the vigorously lifelike collage images to spring to the fore. Bright-eyed frogs appear ready to jump off the pages; a shark swims menacingly toward readers; a wooly mammoth looks soft enough to pet. Science at its most inviting. Ages 6-10. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 3-6-Jenkins's trademark watercolor cut-paper collages, a large format, and the careful use of both an oversized and small font are definite lures into this handsome exploration of the basics of evolution. The author has taken on the formidable task of investigating the scientific theories explaining the innumerable branchings, proliferations, and extinctions of life on planet Earth. His lucid text presents a terse chronology of life from its earliest beginnings as one-celled bacteria in the primordial ocean to the appearance of modern man. He then explains how scientists were persuaded that animal/plant classifications and geological/fossil records provided proof that animals and plants had not remained unchanged since a single moment of creation, and discusses how Charles Darwin's investigations in the Gal pagos resulted in his formulation of the theory of evolution. The discussion also includes natural selection, variation and mutation, and how these processes can produce new species and some of the possible causes of extinctions. The final graphic diagram compares Earth's 4 Y billion-year history with a 24-hour day, showing modern man popping into the scene at 11:59:58 p.m. Larger and more eye-catching than Joanna Cole's Evolution (Crowell, 1987; o.p.), and far simpler than Stephen Webster's The Kingfisher Book of Evolution (Kingfisher, 2000), Life on Earth is a polished exposition of a difficult, often controversial scientific concept. Substantial, despite its picture-book appearance.-Patricia Manning, formerly at Eastchester Public Library, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.