Cover image for Moon glowing
Title:
Moon glowing
Author:
Partridge, Elizabeth.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York, N.Y. : Dutton Children's Books, [2002]

©2002
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 26 cm
Summary:
A squirrel, a bat, a beaver and a bear prepare for winter.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 1.4 0.5 66980.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780525468738
Format :
Book

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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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On Order

Summary

Summary

The autumn leaves are twirling down. The squirrel is stashing, the bat swooping, the beaver building, and the big bear is feasting well. In this simple, rhythmic story, four quite different furry animals prepare resting places for the coming winter. Spare prose by award-winning author Elizabeth Partridge marks the progress of each animal and the final, quiet beauty of the forest's first snowfall. Joan Paley's colorful, textured collage art, playful yet tender, captures the wonder of the unfolding autumn season and the arrival of the silent winter. This warmly stylized vision of a changing forest and its four snug tenants is sure to become a favorite of young children.


Author Notes

Elizabeth Partridge has written a wide range of books for children, including the picture book Oranges on Golden Mountain .

Joan Paley is the illustrator of a number of picture books.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

K^-Gr. 2. This attractive introduction to the hibernation habits of several animals can also serve as a bedtime story; the rhyming text reinforces the methodical preparation for the long winter and ends on a somnolent note, "Moon, big moon, glowing bright. All sleeping, sleeping tight." Bold, clean collage art shows a squirrel, a bat, a beaver, and a "bear, big bear" collecting food and seeking out or building a winter shelter it needs to keep warm. The cut-paper illustrations, augmented with oil paints, watercolors, crayons, and colored pencils, manage to capture the textures of tree bark and fur, wings and tails, and Paley's deep palette suits the late-autumn, nighttime setting. The images of the animals curled snuggly in their trees, dens, and dams will make children want to snuggle under their own covers for the night. Diane Foote


Publisher's Weekly Review

In this gloriously illustrated, economically paced volume, autumn arrives in a swirl of orange leaves and a blast of icy wind that ripples the water, and four animals-squirrel, bat, beaver and bear-end their frolicking and begin preparing for the long winter. (The final page offers easy-to-understand details on the four animals' winter habits.) Partridge's (Oranges on Golden Mountain) austere, almost poetic prose-often just a noun and verb per page-trace each animal's activities, always in the same order. Paley (The Emperor Lays an Egg) echoes the simplicity of the text, representing the animals' instinctive labors with collages of subtle, mesmerizing beauty. She animates the bold, neutral-colored shapes of the animals through intricate texturing. With a weave-like criss-crossing, she details the webby construction of the bat's wings as it readies for its upside-down hibernation ("bat scrambling"); with countless striations of black and gray, she draws readers into the thick, furry depths of the bear's coat as he readies his den and hunkers down ("Bear, big bear, digging deep"). Her backdrops, meanwhile, capture the sky changing from warm azure to chilly gradations of violet; on the final spread, the snow's ice crystals glitter with orange light from the glowing moon. As the animals cuddle up for their long sleep, Partridge chooses long vowel sounds for each of the four animals, emphasizing a soporific mood: "Nose tucking,/ wings folding,/ eyes closing./ Paws, big paws, wrapping round." This lovely, understated entry doubles as an ideal introduction to hibernation and a languorous entree to nighttime dreams. Ages 2-6. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-As autumn leaves fall, a squirrel, bat, beaver, and bear prepare for colder weather. When winter clouds roll in, all four seek shelter and then sleep as snow blankets their woodland home. This deceptively straightforward tale subtly conveys the concept of hibernation to a young audience-its urgency, its inevitability, and its cozy and somnolent warmth. Each animal is composed of basic cut-paper shapes given furry texture with mixed-media decoration. The forest backgrounds are simple but boldly colored. The repetitive pattern of the pared-down text with two to five words per page will engage young listeners while the well-chosen vocabulary and gentle lyricism will charm them. An appended brief description of how each of the four creatures hibernates will satisfy basic curiosity. A must purchase for the youngest naturalists, and a handsome and informative addition to winter-themed toddler storytimes.-Carol Ann Wilson, Westfield Memorial Library, NJ (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.