Cover image for Get well, Good Knight
Title:
Get well, Good Knight
Author:
Thomas, Shelley Moore.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Dutton, [2002]

©2002
Physical Description:
44 pages, 4 unnumbered pages : color illustrations ; 22 cm
Summary:
A Good Knight helps three little dragons who are in bed with a cold.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
AD 120 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 2.3 0.5 61039.

Reading Counts RC K-2 2.2 2 Quiz: 32849 Guided reading level: K.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780525469148
Format :
Book

Available:*

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READER Juvenile Fiction Readers
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READER Juvenile Fiction Childrens Area-Readers
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Cough cough. Sniffle sniffle. Achoo!

The much-heralded Good Knight and his three little dragons are back-only this time the dragons are sick in bed. They need the Good Knight to come to the rescue again and tend to their sniffy, drippy noses and fevery heads. The dragons refuse to take anything yucky, so he has to come up with a special cure. Because he is a Good Knight, he does. Soon the dragons feel much better, but...Achoo! Get Well, Good Knight!


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

K^-Gr. 2. In this Dutton Easy Reader, a sequel to Good Night, Good Knight (2000), the Good Knight gallops through the forest to find out who is sneezing. He soon finds a cave where three feverish little dragons lie coughing and sniffling. Answering the knight's plea for help, a wizard concocts first a "scaly snail-y soup," then a "slimy grimy soup," but neither is palatable enough to swallow. When the Good Knight's mother makes chicken soup, though, the little dragons slurp the cure down. A plot summary does little justice to a book that goes beyond good narrative structure and simple words to create a tale that is always winning and frequently funny. The subject and the appealing ink-and-watercolor illustrations will attract young readers, but a great deal of the book's charm lies in the telling. Excellent for young readers and for reading aloud to younger children who are intrigued by knights and dragons. --Carolyn Phelan


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 2-As in Good Night, Good Knight (Dutton, 2000), Thomas and Plecas bring engaging twists to familiar story elements for beginning readers. Here the knight finds his three little dragon friends suffering with terrible colds and the noble fellow sets off to seek a healing potion. The wizard's "scaly, snail-y soup" is too dreadful to eat and his slimy, grimy brew equally distasteful, so the knight asks his mother for help. With a "little of this and a little of that," she prepares a delicious cure. Plecas's cartoon illustrations have requisite picture clues, cheerful colors, and lots of details. Ingredients for the wizard's concoctions are printed in bold type over the steam coming from his pot. Dragons whose expressions are oh-so-miserably sick miraculously beam with health and vitality on the last page. This is a royal treat to soothe any beginning reader's blues and will inspire repeated readings.-Laura Scott, Baldwin Public Library, Birmingham, MI (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.