Cover image for The Olympic century : the official history of the modern Olympic movement.
Title:
The Olympic century : the official history of the modern Olympic movement.
Author:
1st Century Project.
Publication Information:
Los Angeles : World Sport Research & Publications, [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
24 volumes : illustrations, portraits (some color) ; 31 cm
General Note:
"The Olympic Century Series was produced as a joint editorial effort between the International Olympic Committee, the United States Olympic Committee, 1st Century Project, World Sport Research & Publications, and other Olympic family entities throughout the world to provide an official continuity series ..."--T.p. verso.

Maps on lining papers.

Vol. 21 cover and spine read XXIII Olympiad while title page reads XXI Olympiad.
Language:
English
Contents:
v. 1. The ancient Olympiads & bridges to the modern era / James M. Lynch -- v. 2. -- v. 3. The II Olympiad : Paris 1900, The Nordic Games / Carl A. Posey -- v. 4. The III Olympiad : St. Louis 1904, Athens 1906 / Carl A. Posey -- v. 5. The IV Olympiad : London 1908, The International YMCA / George M. Constable -- v. 6. The V & VI Olympiads : Stockholm 1912, The inter-allied games / George G. Daniels.

v. 7. The VII Olympiad : Antwerp 1920, Chamonix 1924 / Ellen Phillips -- v. 8. The VIII Olympiad : Paris 1924, St. Moritz 1928 / Ellen Phillips -- v. 9. The IX Olympiad : Amsterdam 1928, Lake Placid 1932 / George Russell -- v. 10. X Olympiad : Los Angeles 1932, Garmisch-Partenkirchen 1936 / Ellen Galford -- v. 11. The XI, XII, & XIII Olympiads : Berlin 1936, St. Moritz 1948 / George M. Constable -- v. 12. The XIV Olympiad : London 1948, Oslo 1952 / George G. Daniels.

v. 13. The XV Olympiad : Helsinki 1952, Cortina d'Ampezzo 1956 / Carl A. Posey -- v. 14. The XVI Olympiad : Melbourne 1956, Squaw Valley 1960 / Carl A. Posey -- v. 15. The XVII Olympiad : Rome 1960, Innsbruck 1964 / Ellen Phillips -- v. 16. The XVIII Olympiad : Tokyo 1964, Grenoble 1968 / Carl A. Posey -- v. 17. The XIX Olympiad : Mexico City 1968, Sapporo 1972 / George G. Daniels -- v. 18. The XX Olympiad : Munich 1972, Innsbruck 1976 / George G. Daniels -- v. 19. The XXI Olympiad : Montreal 1976, Lake Placid 1980 / George M. Constable.

v. 20. The XXII Olympiad : Moscow 1980, Sarajevo 1984 / Roberta Conlan ; contributing writer George M. Constable -- v. 21. The XXI [i.e. XXIII] Olympiad : Los Angeles 1984, Calgary 1988 / Ellen Galford -- v. 22. The XXIV Olympiad : Seoul 1988, Albertville 1992 / Ellen Galford -- v. 23. XXV Olympiad : Barcelona 1992, Lillehammer 1994 / George M. Constable -- v. 24. The XXVI Olympiad : Atlanta 1996, Nagano 1998 / Carl A. Posey.
ISBN:
9781888383003

9781888383010

9781888383034

9781888383041

9781888383058

9781888383065

9781888383072

9781888383089

9781888383096

9781888383102

9781888383119

9781888383126

9781888383133

9781888383140

9781888383157

9781888383164

9781888383171

9781888383188

9781888383195

9781888383201

9781888383218

9781888383225

9781888383232

9781888383249
Format :
Book

Available:*

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On Order

Summary

Summary

This 24-volume set presents the official history of the modern Olympic movement and celebrates its diversity, athletes, and ongoing achievements. A long-term joint effort of the International Olympic Committee and the US Olympic Committee, this book project will complement a planned host of educational projects for the web and other media. Each volume covers one or two games occurring since the ancient Olympiad to the games in Atlanta in 1996 and Nagano in 1998 (the stories behind the cancellation of several games over the years are also covered). The volumes are extensively and attractively illustrated with color and b & w photographs, reproductions of paintings and drawings, and other images. Each volume includes statistics and historical notes as well as a bibliography and an index. Future (not prepaid) coverage, beginning with Volume 25 (Sydney and Salt Lake City) in February 2004, will appear every four years. Due to a production problem, Volume 2 was delayed but will probably be available by March 2003. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR


Summary

#Includes bibliographical references (p. ) and index.


Summary

#Includes bibliographical references (p. ) and index.


Reviews 9

Booklist Review

This joint project with the International Olympic Committee (IOC) and the U.S. Olympic Committee (USOC) covers the Olympic movement from its beginnings in Greece through modern times. Following volume 1, which surveys the ancient Olympiads and efforts to reestablish the Olympic Games in the nineteenth century, the set progresses from 1896 to 1998. A twenty-fifth volume, scheduled for publication in 2004, will deal with Sydney 2000 and Salt Lake City 2002. Each volume contains between 176 and 180 pages and is lavishly illustrated. Lively narrative is accompanied by photographs of athletes, events, posters, medals, and more. Maps show various venues. Sidebars highlight particular sports or personalities or offer interesting sidelights. For example, a sidebar in the volume that covers 1936 to 1948 tells about the fate of several Jewish medal winners and a version of the games held in German prisoner-of-war camps in 1944. An appendix in each volume offers programs of events, selected statistics, and medal counts, along with lists of IOC members. Because this is a history of the Olympic movement rather than just the games, a considerable amount of page space is devoted to behind-the-scenes IOC and USOC activities. The writers do not avoid controversial topics such as drug use and bribery scandals. There is a great deal of useful information here, both visual and textual, but there are also several impediments to the work's value as a reference tool. Each volume has its own index, but there is as yet no comprehensive index to the set. A reader who consults a volume's table of contents to locate coverage of specific Olympiads will not find chapter titles such as "A Soaring Spirit" and "Shades and Shadows" helpful. Finally, in several volumes, the table of contents gives incorrect page numbers. For a more accessible A^-Z arrangement or more exhaustive statistics readers will need to turn to other reference sources, such as Historical Dictionary of the Olympic Movement (Scarecrow, 1995), Historical Dictionary of the Modern Olympic Movement (Greenwood, 1996), and volumes in McFarland's Results of the Early Modern Olympics series. Public libraries where there is a strong interest in the Olympics might consider The Olympic Century for its scope and visual appeal. Plans for an online component with curriculum guides and other material should make it attractive to high-school libraries as well.


Publisher's Weekly Review

In preparation for 20 years, The Olympic Century: The Official History of the Modern Olympic Movement, a 24-volume series, begins rollout in November. A joint editorial undertaking (the International Olympic Committee, the U.S. Olympic Committee, 1st Century Project and World Sport Research & Publications) led by former chair of 1st Century Project, screenwriter Gary Allison, provides a definitive reference on all aspects of the Olympics. The first volume, The Ancient Olympiads & Bridges to the Modern Era: Ancient Olympia 2100 BC to AD 1894, explains the origins of the games and provides historic information nuggets (the first Olympiad was a race in 776 B.C.; Diagoras of Rhodes was the Olympic boxing champion in 464 B.C.). Subsequent volumes explore each Olympiad from 1896 through the 1998 games (with 2000 and 2002 to be released in 2004). Each volume contains its own reference section with statistics, notes, credits, bibliography and index. (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

The result of a 20-year effort involving an international team of researchers and writers, this superb historical reference collection aims "to provide an official continuity series that will serve as the corner stone for a permanent education source for individuals, schools and public libraries." Certainly, this objective has been achieved. The scope of the study is exhaustive; after Volume 1, The Ancient Games, each volume covers a four-year range (or Olympiad) up to the 1996/1998 Olympics in Volume 24. (Volume 25, covering Sydney and Salt Lake City, will be available in October 2004.) Each installment is individually written in clear and evocative prose; the text offers a history of that Olympiad and recounts significant events surrounding it, e.g., the growth of the National Olympic Committees. Common to every volume are numerous photos/ illustrations, an extensive index, a bibliography, maps, informative sidebars, and appendixes. Unequivocally, The Olympic Century is a beautifully bound celebration of the diversity of the modern athletic competition. Recommended for large sports collections. [This set was previously available by subscription only. Ed.] Larry R. Little, Penticton P.L., BC (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

Kinney's encyclopedia covers the entire history of the Olympics movement, antiquity through the 1998 Winter Games. Most volumes include the history of a summer Olympiad with a second sporting event, usually the following Winter Games. Entries are written in lively prose, aimed at general readers. All aspects of the Olympics are covered. Each volume provides a thorough account of the host location, detailed reviews of the competition, and an examination of major related social and political issues, including Olympic boycotts. The narratives are respectful yet critical, and analyze controversial issues, with an entire chapter on the 1998 IOC corruption investigation (though largely exonerating IOC Chairman Samaranch). Each volume is handsomely illustrated, with lengthy bibliographies and maps indicating nations that participated. Appendixes include detailed daily programs, extensive statistics, and national medal counts. All collections. S. A. Riess Northeastern Illinois University


Library Journal Review

These two sturdy, handsomely bound volumes are the first in a projected series of 25 titles that will cover the history of the games from ancient times through 1996. Summaries of events, anecdotal sidebars that capture the flavor of the different locales, and compehensive charts are accompanied by excellent photographs. Recommended for medium to large-sized sports collections. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

Five volumes of this ambitious project are in print, and an additional one should be out in 1996 followed by the rest in 1997. Volume 1 will treat the ancient Olympics; volume 2, the period between the end of the ancient games and the 1896 beginning of the modern Olympics; other volumes cover the summer and winter games of each Olympiad (through Atlanta 1996); and the 25th and final volume is to contain a comprehensive index and extra statistical information. The three books reviewed are volume 8, the VIII Olympiad, which includes the Paris 1914 Summer Games and St. Moritz 1928 Winter Games; volume 11, the XI, XII and & XIII Olympiads: Berlin 1936, the canceled Games during WW II, and St. Moritz 1948; and volume 21, the XXIII Olympiad: Los Angeles 1984 and Calgary 1988. Common features to all three are endpaper world maps showing the countries that participated in the Games described therein; a calendar for the Olympiad, giving dates of International Olympic Committee (IOC) sessions and congresses, regional and other international multisport competitions, etc.; names (with times, distances, and world or Olympic record noted) of medal winners; national medal counts; the daily program of events during the Games; and information on membership of the US Olympic Committee (USOC) and the IOC, IOC awards, and publications. Beautiful photographs (athletes, ceremonies, sport facilities, medals, and memorabilia) are found on nearly every page. Maps show locations of the principal competition areas. The text is organized in narrative form, with one topic merging with little transition into another. Topics include the selection of Olympic sites and descriptions of their characateristics, outstanding athletic performances, sidelights on personal histories of athletes and other players in the Olympic scene, and politics of the IOC and other sport organizations. For both summer and winter games, some sports are not mentioned at all, or only in sidebars of photograph captions. Although the content is topical and emphasizes "human interest stories" rather than attempting completeness, this series would be a valuable resource for academic libraries. Volume 8 interweaves descriptions of post-WW I France with stories of Paavo Nurmi's personal history, training, and distance running exploits, the rugby (especially the US France match) and marathon competitions (with background on America's Clarence De Mar), and the participation of African Americans in US sport and the two pioneer African American medal winners at Paris in 1924. Less space is given to race walking, fencing, and boxing, as well as women's participation in the 1924 Games and Gertrude Ederle's later Channel swim. A separate chapter discusses IOC leaders Coubertin and Baillet-Latour; controversies over definition of amateur status; workers' sport festivals of the 1920s and 1930s; women's entry into international sport, especially the efforts of Alice Milliat in track and field and her Women's Olympics; and the promotion of regional games by the IOC. The physical setting and installations for the St. Moritz Winter Games are described, and extensive coverage is devoted to figure skater Sonja Henie. Other skaters, sledding, Nordic skiing, and ski jumping are also mentioned. Volume 11 describes aspects of the Germany of 1936 and the Nazis' rise to power. Major topics include the first-ever Olympic torch relay from ancient Olympia to the Games' site, Jesse Owens's background and his four-medal performance in Berlin, the work of German sport leaders Carl Diem and Theodor Lewald, Nazi treatment of German Jews and the threatened US boycott of the Games, and the courageous equestrian performance of Konrad von Wangeheim. The magnificent sport facilities are described, as well as Leni Riefenstahl's film Olympia, Nazi officials' sumptuous entertainment of Olympic guests, swimmer Eleanor Holm's partying and subsequent banishment from the US team, and performance in a variety of sports, including the baseball demonstration put on by two US teams. One chapter is devoted to prominent IOC personalities and Committee activities carried out during the war years. Volume 21 sets the stage with Peter Ueberroth and the Organizing Committee's efforts to sell the Los Angeles games and continues with stories of outstanding track and field performers, as well as briefer glimpses of boxers, cyclers, swimmers and divers, and gymnastics, judo, wrestling, and rowing athletes. One chapter touches on the history of women's participation in the Olympics and then focuses on Joan Benoit's marathon, Mary Decker and Zola Budd, and other highlights of the 1984 women's competition, including the first gold medal performance ever for a women from an Arab nation. Another chapter discusses the fate of the profits from the Los Angeles Games; Robert Helnick and USOC and IOC politics; the establishment of International Sport Leisure as the agency to carry out global marketing strategy for the Olympic Games; and IOC policies related to greater participation of professionals. The section on the 1988 Winter Games discusses the situation of Calgary as host, and features stories of top performers in alpine skiing and figure skating, as well as the Jamaican bobsledders and other colorful losers. General readers; undergraduates through faculty. R. McGehee Southeastern Louisiana University


Choice Review

Five volumes of this ambitious project are in print, and an additional one should be out in 1996 followed by the rest in 1997. Volume 1 will treat the ancient Olympics; volume 2, the period between the end of the ancient games and the 1896 beginning of the modern Olympics; other volumes cover the summer and winter games of each Olympiad (through Atlanta 1996); and the 25th and final volume is to contain a comprehensive index and extra statistical information. The three books reviewed are volume 8, the VIII Olympiad, which includes the Paris 1914 Summer Games and St. Moritz 1928 Winter Games; volume 11, the XI, XII and & XIII Olympiads: Berlin 1936, the canceled Games during WW II, and St. Moritz 1948; and volume 21, the XXIII Olympiad: Los Angeles 1984 and Calgary 1988. Common features to all three are endpaper world maps showing the countries that participated in the Games described therein; a calendar for the Olympiad, giving dates of International Olympic Committee (IOC) sessions and congresses, regional and other international multisport competitions, etc.; names (with times, distances, and world or Olympic record noted) of medal winners; national medal counts; the daily program of events during the Games; and information on membership of the US Olympic Committee (USOC) and the IOC, IOC awards, and publications. Beautiful photographs (athletes, ceremonies, sport facilities, medals, and memorabilia) are found on nearly every page. Maps show locations of the principal competition areas. The text is organized in narrative form, with one topic merging with little transition into another. Topics include the selection of Olympic sites and descriptions of their characateristics, outstanding athletic performances, sidelights on personal histories of athletes and other players in the Olympic scene, and politics of the IOC and other sport organizations. For both summer and winter games, some sports are not mentioned at all, or only in sidebars of photograph captions. Although the content is topical and emphasizes "human interest stories" rather than attempting completeness, this series would be a valuable resource for academic libraries. Volume 8 interweaves descriptions of post-WW I France with stories of Paavo Nurmi's personal history, training, and distance running exploits, the rugby (especially the US France match) and marathon competitions (with background on America's Clarence De Mar), and the participation of African Americans in US sport and the two pioneer African American medal winners at Paris in 1924. Less space is given to race walking, fencing, and boxing, as well as women's participation in the 1924 Games and Gertrude Ederle's later Channel swim. A separate chapter discusses IOC leaders Coubertin and Baillet-Latour; controversies over definition of amateur status; workers' sport festivals of the 1920s and 1930s; women's entry into international sport, especially the efforts of Alice Milliat in track and field and her Women's Olympics; and the promotion of regional games by the IOC. The physical setting and installations for the St. Moritz Winter Games are described, and extensive coverage is devoted to figure skater Sonja Henie. Other skaters, sledding, Nordic skiing, and ski jumping are also mentioned. Volume 11 describes aspects of the Germany of 1936 and the Nazis' rise to power. Major topics include the first-ever Olympic torch relay from ancient Olympia to the Games' site, Jesse Owens's background and his four-medal performance in Berlin, the work of German sport leaders Carl Diem and Theodor Lewald, Nazi treatment of German Jews and the threatened US boycott of the Games, and the courageous equestrian performance of Konrad von Wangeheim. The magnificent sport facilities are described, as well as Leni Riefenstahl's film Olympia, Nazi officials' sumptuous entertainment of Olympic guests, swimmer Eleanor Holm's partying and subsequent banishment from the US team, and performance in a variety of sports, including the baseball demonstration put on by two US teams. One chapter is devoted to prominent IOC personalities and Committee activities carried out during the war years. Volume 21 sets the stage with Peter Ueberroth and the Organizing Committee's efforts to sell the Los Angeles games and continues with stories of outstanding track and field performers, as well as briefer glimpses of boxers, cyclers, swimmers and divers, and gymnastics, judo, wrestling, and rowing athletes. One chapter touches on the history of women's participation in the Olympics and then focuses on Joan Benoit's marathon, Mary Decker and Zola Budd, and other highlights of the 1984 women's competition, including the first gold medal performance ever for a women from an Arab nation. Another chapter discusses the fate of the profits from the Los Angeles Games; Robert Helnick and USOC and IOC politics; the establishment of International Sport Leisure as the agency to carry out global marketing strategy for the Olympic Games; and IOC policies related to greater participation of professionals. The section on the 1988 Winter Games discusses the situation of Calgary as host, and features stories of top performers in alpine skiing and figure skating, as well as the Jamaican bobsledders and other colorful losers. General readers; undergraduates through faculty. R. McGehee Southeastern Louisiana University


Library Journal Review

These two sturdy, handsomely bound volumes are the first in a projected series of 25 titles that will cover the history of the games from ancient times through 1996. Summaries of events, anecdotal sidebars that capture the flavor of the different locales, and compehensive charts are accompanied by excellent photographs. Recommended for medium to large-sized sports collections. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

Five volumes of this ambitious project are in print, and an additional one should be out in 1996 followed by the rest in 1997. Volume 1 will treat the ancient Olympics; volume 2, the period between the end of the ancient games and the 1896 beginning of the modern Olympics; other volumes cover the summer and winter games of each Olympiad (through Atlanta 1996); and the 25th and final volume is to contain a comprehensive index and extra statistical information. The three books reviewed are volume 8, the VIII Olympiad, which includes the Paris 1914 Summer Games and St. Moritz 1928 Winter Games; volume 11, the XI, XII and & XIII Olympiads: Berlin 1936, the canceled Games during WW II, and St. Moritz 1948; and volume 21, the XXIII Olympiad: Los Angeles 1984 and Calgary 1988. Common features to all three are endpaper world maps showing the countries that participated in the Games described therein; a calendar for the Olympiad, giving dates of International Olympic Committee (IOC) sessions and congresses, regional and other international multisport competitions, etc.; names (with times, distances, and world or Olympic record noted) of medal winners; national medal counts; the daily program of events during the Games; and information on membership of the US Olympic Committee (USOC) and the IOC, IOC awards, and publications. Beautiful photographs (athletes, ceremonies, sport facilities, medals, and memorabilia) are found on nearly every page. Maps show locations of the principal competition areas. The text is organized in narrative form, with one topic merging with little transition into another. Topics include the selection of Olympic sites and descriptions of their characteristics, outstanding athletic performances, sidelights on personal histories of athletes and other players in the Olympic scene, and politics of the IOC and other sport organizations. For both summer and winter games, some sports are not mentioned at all, or only in sidebars of photograph captions. Although the content is topical and emphasizes "human interest stories" rather than attempting completeness, this series would be a valuable resource for academic libraries. Volume 8 interweaves descriptions of post-WW I France with stories of Paavo Nurmi's personal history, training, and distance running exploits, the rugby (especially the US France match) and marathon competitions (with background on America's Clarence De Mar), and the participation of African Americans in US sport and the two pioneer African American medal winners at Paris in 1924. Less space is given to race walking, fencing, and boxing, as well as women's participation in the 1924 Games and Gertrude Ederle's later Channel swim. A separate chapter discusses IOC leaders Coubertin and Baillet-Latour; controversies over definition of amateur status; workers' sport festivals of the 1920s and 1930s; women's entry into international sport, especially the efforts of Alice Milliat in track and field and her Women's Olympics; and the promotion of regional games by the IOC. The physical setting and installations for the St. Moritz Winter Games are described, and extensive coverage is devoted to figure skater Sonja Henie. Other skaters, sledding, Nordic skiing, and ski jumping are also mentioned. Volume 11 describes aspects of the Germany of 1936 and the Nazis' rise to power. Major topics include the first-ever Olympic torch relay from ancient Olympia to the Games' site, Jesse Owens's background and his four-medal performance in Berlin, the work of German sport leaders Carl Diem and Theodor Lewald, Nazi treatment of German Jews and the threatened US boycott of the Games, and the courageous equestrian performance of Konrad von Wangeheim. The magnificent sport facilities are described, as well as Leni Riefenstahl's film Olympia, Nazi officials' sumptuous entertainment of Olympic guests, swimmer Eleanor Holm's partying and subsequent banishment from the US team, and performance in a variety of sports, including the baseball demonstration put on by two US teams. One chapter is devoted to prominent IOC personalities and Committee activities carried out during the war years. Volume 21 sets the stage with Peter Ueberroth and the Organizing Committee's efforts to sell the Los Angeles games and continues with stories of outstanding track and field performers, as well as briefer glimpses of boxers, cyclers, swimmers and divers, and gymnastics, judo, wrestling, and rowing athletes. One chapter touches on the history of women's participation in the Olympics and then focuses on Joan Benoit's marathon, Mary Decker and Zola Budd, and other highlights of the 1984 women's competition, including the first gold medal performance ever for a women from an Arab nation. Another chapter discusses the fate of the profits from the Los Angeles Games; Robert Helnick and USOC and IOC politics; the establishment of International Sport Leisure as the agency to carry out global marketing strategy for the Olympic Games; and IOC policies related to greater participation of professionals. The section on the 1988 Winter Games discusses the situation of Calgary as host, and features stories of top performers in alpine skiing and figure skating, as well as the Jamaican bobsledders and other colorful losers. General readers; undergraduates through faculty. R. McGehee Southeastern Louisiana University