Cover image for Can you hear a rainbow? : the story of a deaf boy named Chris
Title:
Can you hear a rainbow? : the story of a deaf boy named Chris
Author:
Heelan, Jamee Riggio.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
Atlanta : Peachtree Publishers, [2002]

©2002
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 24 cm.
Summary:
A deaf child tells how he uses sign language, hearing aids, and his other senses to communicate, how his friends help him, and how he goes to public school with an interpreter.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
730 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 3.9 0.5 60627.

Reading Counts RC K-2 3.8 2 Quiz: 34265 Guided reading level: M.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9781561452682
Format :
Book

Available:*

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HV2392 .H44 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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HV2392 .H44 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Childrens Area
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HV2392 .H44 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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HV2392 .H44 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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HV2392 .H44 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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On Order

Summary

Summary

"Does a rainbow make a noise?" a deaf child asks a hearing friend. "No," he is told. "Some things don't need a noise. A rainbow is just the same for you and me."

When Chris was a baby, his parents realized that he didn't notice the dog barking or a door slamming. Through a series of tests, doctors determined that he was deaf. In this intriguing, reassuring book, Chris tells young readers about what it is like to be deaf and describes typical events in his life and the ways he has adjusted to his hearing loss. With the assistance of hearing aids, Chris is able to hear vibrations, loud noises, and some other sounds. With sign language, speech therapy, and an interpreter, Chris' days are much like those of hearing children, filled with classes, soccer games, and children's theater.

Accompanied by Simmonds' vivid and energetic multimedia paintings, Heelan's text explores the world of a real child and answers the questions many children may have about hearing loss.


Author Notes

Jamee Riggio Heelan holds a BS in occupational therapy from the University of Kansas. She is the coordinator of the Children's Amputee Program at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago. Her work is dedicated to treating children and educating others about childhood disabilities. She lives in Illinois.

Nicola Simmonds holds a BA Honors in Visual Communications from the University of Brighton. She has been involved in the design and production of children's books for the past decade, both in England and the United States. She lives in Georgia.


Reviews 1

School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 3-Chris, who's about 10 years old, explains how he uses sign language, hearing aids, lip reading, and other visual clues to compensate for his condition. He compares himself to both a hearing friend and a deaf one, pointing out similarities and differences. Computer-generated pictures of photo-realistic heads, faces, arms, hands, a dog, and other living things are superimposed on clothes, furniture, and backgrounds. The boxed text has clear and distinct borders that complement the background colors. The result is a rather interesting effect-not as sharp as photographs, but more realistic than drawings. Although the material covered isn't new, it is accurate and worth repeating, and the format is appealing.-Nancy A. Gifford, Schenectady County Public Library, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.