Cover image for Penguin post
Title:
Penguin post
Author:
Gliori, Debi.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First U.S. edition.
Publication Information:
San Diego : Harcourt, [2002]

©2002
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 29 cm
Summary:
While his mother is looking for food and his father is tending their egg, a young penguin named Milo is charged with delivering the mail, not knowing that he is about to make a very special delivery.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 3.2 0.5 65193.
Electronic Access:
Publisher description http://www.loc.gov/catdir/description/har021/2001006925.html
ISBN:
9780152167653
Format :
Book

Available:*

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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Milo is the youngest in a long line of Penguin Post penguins. But not for long--his mom has laid an egg, and now a new sibling is on the way. Milo's not sure how he feels about this, especially since delivering the mail has suddenly become his job. But bringing packages to his neighbors turns out to be more fun than Milo thought, and then a big surprise at the end of his route becomes the best delivery of all.
From Debi Gliori, creator of the acclaimed No Matter What and illustrator of the bestselling Tell Me Something Happy Before I Go to Sleep and Tell Me What It's Like to Be Big, here is a sibling story for any child who has--or is expecting--a new brother or sister.


Author Notes

Author and illustrator Debi Gliori was born in 1959 in Glasgow, Scotland. She went to school there as well and studied design and illustration at Edinburgh College of Art. She received an Andrew Grant traveling scholarship to go to Milan for a year. Gliori is best known for her work with children's books. Her picture book Mr. Bear to the Rescue won the Children's Book Award and was short listed for the Kate Greenaway Prize. Where, Oh Where, is Baby Bear? was shortlisted for the Sainsbury's Baby Book Award in 2001. Always and Forever, written by Alan Durant and illustrated by Debi Gliori, was shortlisted for the Kate Greenaway Medal in 2003. Her work has also been shortlisted for the Scottish Arts Council Award (for Pure Dead Wicked in 2003), and for the Royal Mail Award, for Stormy Weather in 2010.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

PreS^-Gr. 2. This adventure story starring a mail-toting young penguin will delight fans of Berkeley Breathed's A Wish for Wings That Work (1991) and Allan Ahlberg's Jolly Postman books. Through paintings both cozy and arresting, children will follow Milo, "the youngest in a long line of Penguin Post penguins," as he ventures from home to deliver the mail for his parents, who are tending their egg. Large pictures good for small-group sharing show the cheery interior of the Penguin Post, but they become bluer, colder, and grayer as Milo's job becomes more challenging. Whether bringing mail to a bear named Mrs. Ursula Major; to Mrs. Bee U. Tiffle, the queen bee at Vanity Hive; or to Mama Oose's Baby Mooseline, each delivery treats children to pictures packed with quirky fun. Milo's last stop is the by far the best: a "special delivery" to his own house. What could it be? Kids who miss the package mix-up early on (and there may be quite a few) are in for a sweet surprise. Connie Fletcher


Publisher's Weekly Review

Milo is a dubious sibling-to-be in a family of penguin postal workers. Given the choice between keeping the egg warm and delivering the mail, he eagerly chooses the latter-not knowing that his father has mistakenly packed the egg in the red mailbag along with all the other deliveries (readers will easily spot the unmistakable oval bulge as Milo goes on his appointed rounds). The comforts and joys of family life are Gliori's (Tell Me What It's Like to Be Big) mtier, and her picaresque tale takes Milo to a panoply of fanciful addresses where infants are cherished, including the treetop hideaway of a moose who's ordered a papoose for her offspring and the hive of a mama bee (in a hilarious painting, Milo presents a mail-order sleeper for the multi-legged baby daughter). At first, Milo is unmoved by these scenes of bliss, and shrugs off inquiries about his own family's upcoming arrival. But when he climbs "a rickety rope ladder to the lonely place in the sky" and delivers thousands of baby stars to an ecstatic Stella Polaris, he realizes what his family needs-just in time to welcome his baby brother. Gliori appreciates the skepticism of her target audience, even if Milo's sudden change of heart seems abrupt. The wide-eyed, tuxedoed hero will enchant youngsters, who will pore over the wealth of clever details. The diminutive hero's determination to deliver his packages may well put readers in mind of a formal-attired Santa junior. Ages 3-7. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 1-Young Milo, "the youngest in a long line of Penguin Post penguins," is unsure about the new baby on the way. While his father keeps the egg warm and his mother goes out in search of food, Milo helps out by delivering the mail. At each stop, his customers are awaiting packages containing baby items and ask about the egg. Some of his neighbors are unrealistically out of place, though, as they are found in northern regions, and penguins inhabit only the Southern Hemisphere. (Other customers, such as Cool Cat and Mrs. Tiffle, a bee, are unlikely to live on icebergs.) The plot takes a peculiar turn when Milo climbs a ladder into the sky to deliver baby stars to Stella Polaris, the North Star. She grants him a wish just as he hears a "CRACK" and realizes that the egg has been in his bag all along. In the end, Milo is happy about his new sibling and delighted about the package he receives addressed to a "very special brother" from all of the creatures he has visited. The full-page cartoon illustrations in cool shades of green and blue are filled with humorous touches, but the problematic narrative holds little interest and doesn't have much to offer older siblings-to-be.-Melinda Piehler, North Tonawanda Public Library, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.