Cover image for Horace and Morris join the chorus (but what about Dolores?)
Title:
Horace and Morris join the chorus (but what about Dolores?)
Author:
Howe, James, 1946-
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Atheneum Books for Young Readers, [2002]

©2002
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 27 cm
Summary:
Delores is upset when her friends are chosen to sing in the chorus, but she finds a way to become part of the performance.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 2.6 0.5 65623.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780689839399
Format :
Book

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On Order

Summary

Summary

Horace and Morris, but mostly Dolores, are back again for another uproarious adventure. When the three best friends decide to try out for the school chorus together, they're shocked when Dolores (who can only sing notes that no one has ever heard before) is the only one who doesn't make the cut. After all, they've always done everything together.
Once Horace and Morris start chorus practice, they're so busy that they don't have time to go exploring or climb trees with Dolores anymore. Feeling left out and alone, Dolores decides to take matters into her own hands. But can she prove to Moustro Provolone that there's a place for every kind of voice in the chorus?


Author Notes

James Howe was born in Oneida, New York on August 2, 1946. He attended Boston University and majored in theater. Before becoming a full-time author, he worked as a literary agent. His first book, Bunnicula, was published in 1979. It won several awards including the Dorothy Canfield Fisher Award and the Nene Award. He is the author of more than 90 books for young readers including the Bunnicula series, the Bunnicula and Friends series, the Tales from the House of Bunnicula series, Pinky and Rex series, and the Sebastian Barth Mystery series. His other works include The Hospital Book , A Night Without Stars, Dew Drop Dead, The Watcher, The Misfits, Totally Joe, Addie on the Inside, and Also Known As Elvis.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

PreS^-Gr. 1. Horace, Morris, and Dolores, the happy mouse trio who made such a spirited debut in Horace, and Morris but Mostly Dolores (2001), are back again, and this time the complications to their friendship come in the form of music. The mice try out for the choir. Horace sings, "Squeek to Me Softly of Love," and Morris sings, "Somewhere under the Rainspout," and Dolores just sings loudly. Dolores' friends make the choir, and she doesn't, and she's sad and mad. Attempts at other activities don't work, and in her unhappiness, she writes a poem: "When I'm told I can't sing, the words really sting--and my heart hurts as much as my pride." The choirmaster reads the poem, sets it to music, and Dolores is now recognized as a songwriter. The ending, which sees Dolores also getting to sing in the chorus, seems a little optimistic. She's still not very good. But this mouse trio has such presence and verve that a few plot knots hardly matter. Walrod's delightful illustrations come laugh ready, and the pure colors she employs have pick-me-up appeal. --Ilene Cooper


Publisher's Weekly Review

In a starred review, PW wrote, "In this sympathetic follow-up to Horace and Morris but Mostly Dolores, Howe and Walrod depict a girl mouse's frustrated singing attempts and leaven it with humor." Ages 4-8. (Nov.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 2-A touching and funny sequel to Horace and Morris but Mostly Dolores (Atheneum, 1999). When the three mice friends try out for chorus, Dolores, who often sings "notes no one had ever heard before" doesn't make the cut. She writes a pleading letter in rhyme to Moustro Provolone, asking him to reconsider his decision. He decides that the letter would make great lyrics to put to music, and, of course, Dolores must help sing it. He concludes that, "-everyone has a place in the chorus. Some singers just need a little more help." Walrod gets an astonishing amount of expression into the characters' faces, and their strong friendship as well as a satisfying ending make this tale a winner.-Shelley B. Sutherland, Niles Public Library District, IL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.