Cover image for Big time Olie
Title:
Big time Olie
Author:
Joyce, William.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York, NY : Laura Geringer Books, [2002]

©2002
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 27 cm.
Summary:
Frustrated when his parents tell him he is too little for some things and too big for others, Olie decides to use the shrink and grow-a-lator.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 2.5 0.5 64454.
ISBN:
9780060088101

9780060088118
Format :
Book

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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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On Order

Summary

Summary

"I'm a little bit bigger,
not a little bit smaller.
I'm a little bit taller --
I'm growing Rolie up!"

If Rolie Polie Olie grows a little every day, when will he be big enough?


Author Notes

Author and illustrator, William Joyce was born December 11, 1957. He attended Southern Methodist University.

He has written and illustrated many award-winning picture books. His first published title was Tammy and the Gigantic Fish. His other titles include George Shrinks, Dinosaur Bob, Santa Calls, The Leaf Men, A Day with Wilbur Robinson, Bently and Egg, and Rolie Polie Olie. In addition to writing and illustrating, he also works on movies based on his books.

Among other awards, he has received a Golden Kite Award Honor Book for Illustration and a Society of Illustrators Gold Medal. In addition, he received two Annie awards for his Rolie Polie Olie series on the Disney Channel. He also won an Academy Award in 2012 for the category of Best Animated Short Film for for his work: The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore. He made The New York Times Best Seller List with his title The Numberlys.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

PreS-Gr. 1. The metallic butterball Rolie Polie Olie grapples with growing up in this sweet, satisfying addition to the series. Too small to accompany his parents to Mount Big Ball («big-time unfair»), and too big to jump on the bed while eating ice cream, Olie cries, «I'm not the right size for anything!» This is clearly a job for the shrink-and-grow-a-lator. But when Olie presses the wrong button, he shrinks so small his little sister thinks he is a doll. Urgently pressing the bigger button, he gets so big he jumps up to outer space, bonks his head on the moon, and lands KABOOM! on a mountaintop. Is there no middle ground in this business of growing up? Olie sings a forlorn song. But his family serendipitously saves the day, and that night «he went to sleep in his bed that was just big enough . . . for now.» Karin Snelson.


Publisher's Weekly Review

Familiar characters star in all new adventures this season and a pair of companion volumes encourage wordplay. In William Joyce's Big Time Olie, the robot boy hero makes use of the "shrink-and-grow-a-lator" when his parents exclude him from activities because of his size. Olie gets unexpected results when he hits the wrong buttons on the machine. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 2-Rolie Polie Olie is too small to go to Mount Big Ball and too big to jump on his bed eating ice cream. When he decides to use the "shrink-and-grow-a-lator," he becomes so small that his sister thinks he's a doll; next, he becomes so big that one jump puts him in outer space, and he winds up bruised, burned, and lonely. The family dog, with the help of mom and dad, helps Rolie get back to just the right size, and he decides that "I won't be in such a hurry to grow all Rolie up." The brightly colored characters, fashioned out of round balls, metal springs, and simple shapes, and the slightly futuristic, but somehow old-fashioned cartoon quality of the illustrations meet for a wonderfully playful effect. The spare, rhythmic text perfectly captures the conflicting desires of preschoolers to grow up and venture out, yet to be safe and close to home and family.-Shelley B. Sutherland, Niles Public Library District, IL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.