Cover image for Courage
Title:
Courage
Author:
Waber, Bernard.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Boston : Houghton Mifflin Co., [2002]

©2002
Physical Description:
32 pages : color illustrations ; 22 cm
Summary:
Provides examples of the many kinds of courage found in everyday life and in unusual circumstances, from tasting the vegetable before making a face to being a firefighter or police officer.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 3.3 0.5 65844.
ISBN:
9780618238552
Format :
Book

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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Little Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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On Order

Summary

Summary

What is courage? Certainly it takes courage for a firefighter to rescue someone trapped in a burning building, but there are many other kinds of courage too. Everyday kinds that normal, ordinary people exhibit all the time, like "being the first to make up after an argument," or "going to bed without a nightlight." Bernard Waber explores the many varied kinds of courage and celebrates the moments, big and small, that bring out the hero in each of us.


Author Notes

Bernard Waber was born in 1924 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and educated at the University of Pennsylvania. He also studied art at the Philadelphia College of Art and the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. He wrote and illustrated numerous children's books including The House on East 88th Street, Lyle, Lyle, Crocodile, Lyle at Christmas, Ira Sleeps Over, and Ira Says Goodbye. He died on May 16, 2013.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

K^-Gr. 3. Veteran author-illustrator Waber offers a simple book with a complex message, illustrated with his familiar combination of crayon-colored sweetness and agitated line. The statement, "There are many kinds of courage," begins the book; the illustration shows a skater in full extension in the air, her head and arms held high. "Everyday kinds" of courage are illustrated by a small boy hesitating and then diving off the board into a pool, and courage is also "nobody better pick on your little brother." Boys and girls and even dogs in this book practice the virtue: "Courage is breaking bad habits" shows a dog trying to refrain from attacking a very agitated cat. Some of the displays of courage stretch the concept--saving a candy bar for the morrow or not peeking to see whodunit at the end of a mystery--but mostly Waber succeeds in illustrating an abstraction in concrete ways that will resonate with children. Firefighters and police officers and the courage to say good-bye end the book: "Courage is what we give to each other." --GraceAnne A. DeCandido


Publisher's Weekly Review

In this poignant yet entertaining volume, versatile author and artist Waber (The Mouse That Snored) takes a look at the various ways in which kids, the occasional grown-up and one endearing canine display bravery. "There are many kinds of courage," the narrative begins. "Awesome kinds" appears on a spread of trapeze artists; "everyday kinds" depicts a boy who summons the confidence to jump off a high dive. Minimal yet artfully crafted text and sprightly art reveal some gutsy acts that all youngsters will identify with: taking that first bike ride without training wheels, explaining the rip in a brand-new pair of pants. The author's observations range from lighthearted ("Courage is deliberately stepping on sidewalk cracks") to those worthy of reflection ("Courage is being the first to make up after an argument"). Waber's wit infuses many of the pages, including one from a dog's viewpoint: a "Beware of Dog" sign adorns the front lawn of a house while, inside, a pooch quakes listening to eerie sounds "Courage is it's your job to check out the night noises in the house." On the affecting, timely penultimate spread, scenes of firefighters and a police officer on the job ("Courage is being a firefighter, or a police officer") appear opposite the image of a mother and two children watching a plane take off ("Courage is sometimes having to say goodbye"). Uncovering an array of triumphs and fears, this is a natural read-aloud likely to spark valuable adult-child dialogue and to help youngsters conquer their own fears. Ages 4-8. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 3-Focusing on a variety of scenarios, from the serious ("Courage is being the first to make up after an argument") to the more lighthearted ("Courage is tasting the vegetable before making a face"), Waber introduces children to the many ways to define this character trait. One or two statements appear on each page, accompanied by a whimsical pen-and-ink and watercolor illustration that offers an amusing interpretation of the captionlike text. Some examples seem to fit attributes other than courage more precisely ("Courage is two candy bars and saving one for tomorrow"), but children will certainly relate to most of them. A good read-aloud to spark conversation about what courage is and isn't, and the many forms it takes.-Jessica Snow, Boston Public Library (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.