Cover image for Courageous leadership
Title:
Courageous leadership
Author:
Hybels, Bill.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Grand Rapids, Mich. : Zondervan, [2002]

©2002
Physical Description:
253 pages ; 24 cm
Language:
English
Contents:
The stakes of leadership -- A leader's most potent weapon : the power of vision -- Getting-it-done leadership : turning vision into action -- Building a Kingdom dream team : communities close to a leader's heart -- The resource challenge : the test of a leader's mettle -- Developing emerging leaders : when leaders are at their best -- Discovering and developing your own leadership style : the key to high-impact leading -- A leader's sixth sense : the sources of decision making -- The art of self-leadership: the 360-degree leader -- A leader's prayer: "God, mold and shape me to my full leadership potential" -- The leader's pathway: a vital walk with God -- Developing an enduring spirit: staying the course.
Subject Term:
ISBN:
9780310248231
Format :
Book

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BV652.1 .H93 2002 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

The book you hold resonates with this conviction: that leaders such as you have the potential to be the most influential forces on planet Earth. Yours is the staggering responsibility and the matchless privilege of rallying believers and mobilizing their spiritual gifts in order to help people who are far from God become fully devoted followers of Christ. Life transformation and the eternal destinies of real people depend on the redemptive message entrusted to the local church. Are you willing to do whatever it takes to lead your church effectively so God's message of hope can change the world? Then this book is for you. Courageous Leadership is Bill Hybels' magnum opus, a book far too important to be written before its time. Only now, after nearly thirty years leading his own church from a handful of people with a burning vision into a globe-spanning kingdom force-only after almost three decades of victories and setbacks, of praying hard and risking big-is Hybels ready at last to share the lessons he has learned, and continues to learn, about Christian leadership. Too much is at stake for you not to maximize your spiritual gift of leadership, insists Hybels. In this passionate, powerful book, he unpacks the tools, tasks, and challenges of your calling. You'll discover the power of vision and how to turn it into action. You'll gain frontline insights for developing a kingdom dream team, discovering your leadership style, developing other leaders, making decisions, walking with God, embracing change, staying your God-given course, and much, much more. Drawing on his own richly varied life experiences, Hybels fleshes out vital principles with riveting firsthand stories. This is far more than another book on leadership strategies and techniques. You'll find those topics in here, to be sure. But beyond them, you'll find the very essence of one of today's foremost Christian leaders-his fervent commitment to evangelism and discipleship and his zeal to inspire fellow church leaders even as he seeks to keep growing as a leader himself. If unchurched people matter to you . . . if you love seeing believers serve passionately with their spiritual gifts . . . if God's heartbeat for the church is your heartbeat as well . . . then this book is a must. Courageous Leadership will convince you to lead with all your might, all your skill, and all your faith. And it will give you the tools to do just that.


Author Notes

Bill Hybels was born in 1951 in Kalamazoo, Michigan. He received hs BA degree in Biblical Studies from Trinity International University near Chicago. He also has an Honorary Doctorate of Divinity from Trinity Evangelical Divinity School. Bill Hybels is the senior pastor at Willow Creek Community Church in the Chicago suburb of South Barrington, Ill. Hybels founded the church after surveying the community and designing Sunday morning services for non-believers, with services for believers held on another day. He is the creator of the Global Leadership Summit. His book, Rediscovering Church: The Story and Vision of Willow Creek, written with his wife Lynne, outlines the successful formula he used. His other books include Honest to God: Becoming an Authentic Christian; The God You're Looking For; Too Busy Not to Pray: Slowing Down to be With God; Making Life Work and Power of a Whisper.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 1

Publisher's Weekly Review

By any standard contemporary measure, Hybels ranks among the North American Protestantism's most significant leaders. As senior pastor at Willow Creek Community Church in South Barrington, Ill., he leads an all-star team of lay and ordained people ministering to tens of thousands each week. Through his other books (among them Rediscovering Church and Descending into Greatness), and through the Willow Creek Association, he influences thousands of congregations. So his voice on the subject of leadership commands immediate attention. Fortunately, after 30 years, he's got something worthwhile to say and better yet, he says it well. Written in an easy, colorful, anecdote-sprinkled style, this is an inspiring and informative pep talk for pastors who share Hybels's conviction that when it's working right, the "local church is the hope of the world." That hope hinges, he says, on churches being led by those who "possess and deploy the spiritual gift of leadership." While not theologically deep or biblically rigorous, it is full of wise principles, useful lists and practical leadership tips. Hybels covers some of the same territory as other leadership books styles of leadership, team-building, decision-making, developing emerging leaders, etc. but he does so remarkably free of the double-talk and jargon that so often plague them. For example, he graciously disagrees with those leadership gurus who distinguish between a "vision" statement, a "mission" statement, and a "purpose" statement. What folks really need to know and remember, says Hybels, is "the main thing." This is a welcome addition to any pastor's library. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Excerpts

Excerpts

The Stakes of Leadership TEN DAYS AFTER THE ATTACKS ON THE WORLD TRADE CENTER Towers, I stood in the rubble at Ground Zero, overwhelmed by the aftermath of one of the most horrific events in history. On that world-changing morning of September 11, 2001, Manhattan, New York, became a war zone. The terrorists took no prisoners, held no hostages. Death was the only option they offered, so three thousand ordinary people died that day, most without an opportunity for a final embrace or even a last good-bye. The New York City officials who invited me to tour Ground Zero led me past the check points and into "The Pit," the area immediately surrounding the fallen towers. In the grim shadows of the huge cranes that slowly shifted scraps of twisted metal, rescue workers dug through the rubble, and bucket brigades passed pails of debris from hand to hand. The workers moved silently, listening, I knew, for the sounds--any sounds--of survivors. Those ninety minutes will stay with me for the rest of my life. Words cannot convey, nor television screens capture, the enormity of the devastation I saw for that hour and a half. For the first thirty minutes the only two words I could utter were, "No way!" And I said them over and over again. In my imagination I had envisioned the two slender towers sinking into a pile of debris that would fit easily within the confines of a large football stadium. My mental picture was big--and tragic--enough, but reality was a hundred times more tragic. A square mile of ruin. Numerous city blocks obliterated. One of the smaller buildings that came down was over forty stories high. Several larger buildings, still standing when I was there, were buckling and would have to be demolished. Some looked like the Oklahoma Federal Building with its front blown off. Others, blocks away, had windows shattered. The sheer enormity of what happened that day took my breath away. I said "No way!" again when I saw the dedication of the rescue workers, many of whom were still digging after ten days, with bloodied hands and blistered feet, because their firefighting bud-dies were buried under the piles of twisted steel. How can I describe what it was like to be with them, to look into their eyes and see the profound coupling of utter exhaustion and unyielding determination? There were hundreds and hundreds of them. I found myself torn between wanting to grab hold of them and say, "Please stop. You've got to rest. You've got to go home," and at the same time wanting to pat them on the back and say, "Don't give up! If I were under that pile of destruction I'd want someone like you digging for me." I've never been in war, so I've never seen men and women like that. I've never seen people who were nearly dead on their feet walk back into the carnage because they couldn't do otherwise. I'll never forget it. People like that ennoble the human spirit. They remind us that we can still be heroic. Later in the day, I was driven by cab to a designated place several blocks away from the rescue effort, where family and friends were posting pictures of loved ones on a crudely constructed bulletin board that ran for hundreds of feet along the sidewalk. As I looked at the photographs crammed from top to bottom, side to side, again I said, "No way!" No way should men, women, and children have to live with this kind of loss and grief. Back and forth walked the people left behind. For twenty-four hours everyday they wandered like zombies along the city streets, hoping against hope that someone could tell them something about their father, their daughter, their friend. There was no way they could move on with their lives. They couldn't eat or sleep. They couldn't go home without some information, some piece of news, some degree of closure. I could understand their tenacity. What else could they do? If my family--Lynne or Shauna or Todd--or my friends were among those missing beneath the rubble, I would do the same. I'd plaster their pictures all over that wall; I'd grab people by the collar if I thought they could offer me one little shred of information or hope. As I hailed a cab to take me back to my hotel, I felt like screaming my next "No way!" in an attempt to block out the bitterest truth of all, that all this suffering, this holocaust, was caused not by a natural calamity or even some freak accident, but by the deliberate schemes of fellow human beings. No earthquake, no shift in geological plates caused this wreckage. No flood, tornado, or hurricane did this. The death and destruction surrounding me were the direct result of the careful plans of people so caught up in radical political beliefs and so filled with hatred that as they watched the television coverage of Ground Zero they high-fived each other and jumped for joy. "No way!" I cried again. There's no way evil can run this deep. But it did. No matter how incomprehensible was the scene surrounding me, the enormity of evil behind it could not be denied. But strangely, while the ashes smoldered around me and grief overwhelmed me, even then, a profound hope rose in my heart. Slicing through the anguished "no ways" reverberating in my mind were the words I had repeated ten thousand times before, but now they cut with the flash of urgency. The local church is the hope of the world. The local church is the hope of the world. I could see it so clearly. I do not intend to minimize the contribution of the many fine organizations performing wonderful, loving, charitable acts in the middle of the misery of Ground Zero. The Red Cross was handing out work gloves and breathing masks, fresh socks and clean boots. Restaurants were setting up barbecue grills on sidewalks and cooking free food for rescue workers. Soft drink manufacturers donated beverages. Humanitarian groups and corporations set up trust funds with hundreds of millions of dollars for the families of victims. Money poured in. For all these actions Americans should be proud. And I certainly am. Excerpted from Courageous Leadership by Bill Hybels All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgmentsp. 9
Introductionp. 11
1 The Stakes of Leadershipp. 13
2 A Leader's Most Potent Weapon: The Power of Visionp. 29
3 Getting-It-Done Leadership: Turning Vision into Actionp. 51
4 Building a Kingdom Dream Team: Communities Close to a Leader's Heartp. 73
5 The Resource Challenge: The Test of a Leader's Mettlep. 93
6 Developing Emerging Leaders: When Leaders Are at Their Bestp. 121
7 Discovering and Developing Your Own Leadership Style: The Key to High-Impact Leadingp. 139
8 A Leader's Sixth Sense: The Sources of Decision Makingp. 161
9 The Art of Self-leadership: The 360-Degree Leaderp. 181
10 A Leader's Prayer: "God, Mold and Shape Me to My Full Leadership Potential"p. 199
11 The Leader's Pathway: A Vital Walk with Godp. 215
12 Developing an Enduring Spirit: Staying the Coursep. 231