Cover image for Count your way through the Arab world
Title:
Count your way through the Arab world
Author:
Haskins, James, 1941-2005.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Minneapolis : Carolrhoda Books, 1991.

©1987
Physical Description:
24 unnumbered pages : illustrations ; 20 x 24 cm
Summary:
Uses Arabic numerals from one to ten to introduce concepts about Arab countries and Arab culture.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 5.7 0.5 4327.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780876143049

9780876144879
Format :
Book

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DS36.7 .H38 1987 Juvenile Non-Fiction Foreign Language
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Summary

Summary

These beautifully illustrated, interactive picture books introduce children to foreign cultures and languages.


Summary

Uses Arabic numerals from one to ten to introduce concepts about Arab countries and Arab culture.


Author Notes

Author Jim Haskins was born in Demopolis, Alabama on September 19, 1941. He received a B.A. from Georgetown University in 1960, a B.S. from Alabama State University in 1962, and a M.A. from the University of New Mexico in 1963. After graduation, he became a special education teacher in a public school in Harlem. His first book, Diary of a Harlem School Teacher, was the result of his experience there. He taught at numerous colleges and universities before becoming an English professor at the University of Florida, Gainesville in 1977.

He wrote more than 100 books during his lifetime, ranging from counting books for children to biographies on Rosa Parks, Hank Aaron and Spike Lee. He won numerous awards for his work including the 1976 Coretta Scott King Award for The Story of Stevie Wonder, the 1984 Coretta Scott King Award for Lena Horne, the 1979 ASCAP Deems Taylor Award for Scott Joplin: The Man Who Made Ragtime; and the 1994 Washington Post Children's Book Guide Award. He also won the Carter G. Woodson Award for young adult non-fiction for Black Music in America; The March on Washington; and Carter G. Woodson: The Man Who Put "Black" in American History in 1989, 1994, and 2001, respectively. He died from complications of emphysema on July 6, 2005 at the age of 63.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Author Jim Haskins was born in Demopolis, Alabama on September 19, 1941. He received a B.A. from Georgetown University in 1960, a B.S. from Alabama State University in 1962, and a M.A. from the University of New Mexico in 1963. After graduation, he became a special education teacher in a public school in Harlem. His first book, Diary of a Harlem School Teacher, was the result of his experience there. He taught at numerous colleges and universities before becoming an English professor at the University of Florida, Gainesville in 1977.

He wrote more than 100 books during his lifetime, ranging from counting books for children to biographies on Rosa Parks, Hank Aaron and Spike Lee. He won numerous awards for his work including the 1976 Coretta Scott King Award for The Story of Stevie Wonder, the 1984 Coretta Scott King Award for Lena Horne, the 1979 ASCAP Deems Taylor Award for Scott Joplin: The Man Who Made Ragtime; and the 1994 Washington Post Children's Book Guide Award. He also won the Carter G. Woodson Award for young adult non-fiction for Black Music in America; The March on Washington; and Carter G. Woodson: The Man Who Put "Black" in American History in 1989, 1994, and 2001, respectively. He died from complications of emphysema on July 6, 2005 at the age of 63.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

Gr. 3-5.Using numbers from one to ten as his method of approach, Haskins introduces a variety of concepts about these four areas of the world. In Arab World, for example, ``tents with two rooms separated by a curtain are home to most Bedouins,'' ``at least five times a day all Muslims must face Mecca and pray,'' and ``in Arabic there are eight ways to say cousin.'' These statements are briefly expanded on in double-page spreads embellished by drawings as well as a large, boldface numeral and the Arabic symbol and its pronunciation. Each of the books has the same eclectic presentation with varying degrees of interest. China includes information on four important animals in legend, seven zones of vegetation, and a festival honoring the Nine Stars of the Plow. Japan describes cultural concepts such as two chopsticks, five kinds of No plays, and seven calligraphic writing strokes. The Russia volume features snowshoes, church domes, skating medals, and folk dancers. Useful for introducing other cultures, for short classroom reports, or for teaching children to count in another language. Individual books may also serve where new immigrants are joining a community. Illustrations vary in each book and reflect the country under discussion. BE.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 1-4 Four books that introduce a foreign country through counting from one to ten. Each double-page spread shows the number, the character or word for it, the pronunciation, and a full-color illustration. There is also a brief paragraph that gives a few facts about various aspects of life in that country. In the China volume, for example, children read about the two pandas donated to the U.S. in 1972, the five-tone scale, and the ten major dynasties. The kinds of topics vary and seem to be determined in part by what facts Haskins found to illustrate each number. Some information fits well into this format: the importance of prayer five times a day for a Muslim, for example. Others are stretched to fit the point and are not very significant, such as ``The Japanese character for the words `how many' requires seven strokes.'' Many of the topics will require further explanation. Haskins does little more than list the seven zones of vegetation in China, for example. The books may find a place as introductory material in social studies, but they are limited by the fact that format determined content. Kathy Piehl, Mankato State University, Minn. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Gr. 3-5.Using numbers from one to ten as his method of approach, Haskins introduces a variety of concepts about these four areas of the world. In Arab World, for example, ``tents with two rooms separated by a curtain are home to most Bedouins,'' ``at least five times a day all Muslims must face Mecca and pray,'' and ``in Arabic there are eight ways to say cousin.'' These statements are briefly expanded on in double-page spreads embellished by drawings as well as a large, boldface numeral and the Arabic symbol and its pronunciation. Each of the books has the same eclectic presentation with varying degrees of interest. China includes information on four important animals in legend, seven zones of vegetation, and a festival honoring the Nine Stars of the Plow. Japan describes cultural concepts such as two chopsticks, five kinds of No plays, and seven calligraphic writing strokes. The Russia volume features snowshoes, church domes, skating medals, and folk dancers. Useful for introducing other cultures, for short classroom reports, or for teaching children to count in another language. Individual books may also serve where new immigrants are joining a community. Illustrations vary in each book and reflect the country under discussion. BE.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 1-4 Four books that introduce a foreign country through counting from one to ten. Each double-page spread shows the number, the character or word for it, the pronunciation, and a full-color illustration. There is also a brief paragraph that gives a few facts about various aspects of life in that country. In the China volume, for example, children read about the two pandas donated to the U.S. in 1972, the five-tone scale, and the ten major dynasties. The kinds of topics vary and seem to be determined in part by what facts Haskins found to illustrate each number. Some information fits well into this format: the importance of prayer five times a day for a Muslim, for example. Others are stretched to fit the point and are not very significant, such as ``The Japanese character for the words `how many' requires seven strokes.'' Many of the topics will require further explanation. Haskins does little more than list the seven zones of vegetation in China, for example. The books may find a place as introductory material in social studies, but they are limited by the fact that format determined content. Kathy Piehl, Mankato State University, Minn. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.