Cover image for One candle
Title:
One candle
Author:
Bunting, Eve, 1928-
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
[New York] : Joanna Cotler Books, [2002]

©2002
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : illustrations (some color) ; 24 x 28 cm
Summary:
Every year a family celebrates Hanukkah by retelling the story of how Grandma and her sister managed to mark the day while in a German concentration camp.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
420 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 2.9 0.5 63723.

Reading Counts RC K-2 2.8 2 Quiz: 32434 Guided reading level: M.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780060281151

9780060281168
Format :
Book

Available:*

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X Juvenile Fiction Holiday
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X Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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PIC BK Juvenile Current Holiday Item Childrens Area-Holiday
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X Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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X Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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X Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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X Juvenile Fiction Holiday
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Summary

Summary

"Why do you think Grandma wants to do this every year?" I don't know for sure. But I think it has to do with being strong in the bad time and remembering it in the good time. For one family the traditional Hanukkah celebration has a deeper meaning. Amidst the food and the festivities, Grandma and Great-Aunt Rose begin their story-the one they tell each year. They pass on to each generation a tale of perseverance during the darkest hours of the Holocaust, and the strength it took to continue to honor Hanukkah in the only way they could. Best-selling author Eve Bunting's touching and joyous story about the importance of remembrance is exquisitely rendered by K. Wendy Popp's remarkable pastels. One Candle reaffirms the values of tradition and family, but also shows us that by continuing to honor the tragedies and the triumphs of the past there will always be hope for the future.


Author Notes

Eve Bunting was born in 1928 in Maghera, Ireland, as Anne Evelyn Bunting. She graduated from Northern Ireland's Methodist College in Belfast in 1945 and then studied at Belfast's Queen's College. She emigrated with her family in 1958 to California, and became a naturalized citizen in 1969.

That same year, she began her writing career, and in 1972, her first book, "The Two Giants" was published. In 1976, "One More Flight" won the Golden Kite Medal, and in 1978, "Ghost of Summer" won the Southern California's Council on Literature for Children and Young People's Award for fiction. "Smokey Night" won the American Library Association's Randolph Caldecott Medal in 1995 and "Winter's Coming" was voted one of the 10 Best Books of 1977 by the New York Times.

Bunting is involved in many writer's organizations such as P.E.N., The Authors Guild, the California Writer's Guild and the Society of Children's Book Writers. She has published stories in both Cricket, and Jack and Jill Magazines, and has written over 150 books in various genres such as children's books, contemporary, historic and realistic fiction, poetry, nonfiction and humor.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Gr. 2-3, younger for reading aloud. When Grandma and Grandpa arrive for Hanukkah celebrations, Grandma always brings a potato--but not for the traditional potato latkes, which are already filling the house with a luscious aroma. When prayers, candle lighting, and dinner are complete, Grandma, sitting beside Great-Aunt Rose, tells the familiar family story of how a potato that she smuggled from the kitchen at Buchenwald became a light of hope, uniting the girls in the barracks to one another and to the heroic Maccabees of long ago. Popp invests her art with all the emotion of Bunting's heartfelt text--the affection of a close-knit family celebrating the sorrow of lost friends and relatives, and the courage that grew out of tragic times. The sepia palette is infused with glowing light for scenes in the camp while dollops of color distinguish the contemporary celebration. There's a photo-realistic quality to Popp's portraiture that makes it seem as if she has used models from life that she knows well and loves. A gentle but forthright opening for discussion about the Holocaust. Stephanie Zvirin


Publisher's Weekly Review

On the first night of Hanukkah every year, Grandma recites her experience as a 12-year-old in Buchenwald, when she risked her life to steal a potato and margarine to improvise one Hanukkah light. The text feels somewhat forced until Grandma starts speaking, and then the audience will be gripped. Popp's (Sister Anne's Hands) uncannily lifelike, sympathetic group portraits, bathed in soft lighting that visually bridges them to sepia-toned flashback scenes of Buchenwald, evoke the abiding tenderness of family rituals respectfully observed. It would be a pity for the mistake on the cover (the candle is on the wrong side of the menorah here and several times in the interior art) to deter readers from the unusually moving story within. Ages 4-8. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 1-4-Another finely tuned intimate, first-person narrative from Bunting, who delivers a moving family history framed within the celebration of Hanukkah. Grandma ritualistically makes a candle from a hollowed-out potato in memory of the time she and Great-Aunt Rose spent in Buchenwald. The repeated story unites the family as they celebrate the present and remember the past. Exceptionally handsome illustrations lend a realistic quality to the memorable text: sepia tones mute and distance the concentration-camp flashbacks; softly colored tones define contemporary scenes.-S. P. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.