Cover image for Allies at war
Title:
Allies at war
Author:
Quigley, Andrew, director.
Edition:
[DVD version].
Publication Information:
Orland Park, IL : MPI Home Video, [2002]

©2002
Physical Description:
1 videodisc (approximately 125 min.) : sound, color with black and white sequences ; 4 3/4 in.
Summary:
Features rare archival footage, private correspondence, and interviews with historians and insiders, including FDR's grandson Curtis Roosevelt, to explore the relationship between Winston Churchill, Charles de Gaulle and Franklin D. Roosevelt during World War II.
General Note:
Documentary.

English subtitles.

Includes WPA Film Library footage that includes Charles de Gaulle's return to liberated France.

DVD7501

For specific features see interactive menu.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780788604430
Format :
DVD

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D748 .B47 2002V Adult DVD Central Library
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Summary

Summary

Allies At War chronicles the tumultuous relationship between Winston Churchill, Charles de Gaulle and Franklin D. Roosevelt during World War II. Based on the book of the same name by Simon Berthon.


Reviews 2

Library Journal Review

To the rest of the world, Franklin Roosevelt, Winston Churchill, and Gen. Charles de Gaulle were the architects of the World War II victory. This documentary looks beyond diplomacy at the uneasy alliance among the United States, Britain, and France. It explores the distrust, duplicity, and ruthlessness that threatened the Allied policy during the war and the relationships of the three countries after it. Mainly covering the years 1940-45, it uses newsreels and reenactments, with shadowy actors as the three leaders, to give a behind-the-scenes feel. Based on the book of the same name by Simon Berthon, this film paints a very unflattering picture of de Gaulle as a vain, arrogant leader more concerned with achieving his goal of heading a free France than fighting the Nazis. There were constant clashes between de Gaulle on one side and Roosevelt and Churchill on the other. At one point Churchill tapped de Gaulle's telephone and detained him against his will in London. This hidden hostility played a large role in postwar developments. After de Gaulle became president of France, he chastised the United States and blocked Britain's early attempts to join the European Common Market. At the same time it cemented the steadfast partnership between the United States and Great Britain. Recommended for public and academic libraries.-Michael Schau, Seminole Community Coll., Sanford, FL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 9 Up-Franklin Roosevelt, Winston Churchill, and Charles de Gaulle are the "allies at war," as this production demonstrates in a detailed analysis of the stormy relationship of the three leaders. Well documented, with a steady narration from top-secret memoranda and journal entries, this program lends a very personal and human aspect to historical events. DeGaulle is first seen as a young Undersecretary of Defense for France, who impresses Churchill with his passionate identification with his country's honor. However, his arrogance and independence soon put Churchill on the defensive, and eventually forces Churchill to choose between DeGaulle and Roosevelt. Roosevelt disliked de Gaulle because he did not cooperate with the United States, launched operations that jeopardized allied plans, and openly criticized the allies who were working to liberate France. Roosevelt's dislike takes on a personal tone, and both Roosevelt and Churchill refer to de Gaulle as a "prima donna" and a "bitter foe." A peevish de Gaulle will not agree to a post-invasion broadcast to the French until the very eve of D-Day. In an interesting aside, Dwight Eisenhower notes his annoyance at the political machinations that distract him from his military mission. Another interesting insight is the friendship that evolves between Churchill and Roosevelt and their frequent, secret meetings during World War II. Bonus footage on the DVD consists of news clips from the liberation of Paris. Viewers may select individual chapters, a useful index for classroom use where the length of the production would be prohibitive. Actor Brian Dennehy provides narration. Editing and special effects are artistic, smoothly combining documentary footage and still photography with actors representing the three leaders. Transitions are handled with devices such as the calendar, Teletype tape, and typewriter keys. Numerous eyewitness testimonies are provided, including contributions from Curtis Roosevelt, grandson of the former president. World War II buffs will appreciate the level of detail and documentation. Selections may be useful for secondary classrooms.-Melba Tomeo, Slippery Rock University, PA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.