Cover image for The day my runny nose ran away
Title:
The day my runny nose ran away
Author:
Eaton, Jason.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Dutton Children's Books, 2002.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 29 cm
Summary:
One morning Jason wakes up to find something missing--his nose. He follows Montague, his nose, to Nose Island, where a he is leading a nose rebellion. Can Jason foil the nose rebellion? And will he convince his nose to get back on his face?
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 3.7 0.5 63627.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780525470137
Format :
Book

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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Childrens Area-Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Summary

Summary

One morning, Jason wakes up to find something missing-his nose. According to a note left on his pillow, the nose ran off in protest. Jason follows his renegade schnoz all the way to Nose Island, where he discovers that it has become king and is leading a nose revolution! Will Jason succeed in foiling the noses' plan? More important, will he convince his nose to get back on his face? Don't count on it-only the unexpected happens in this fabulously funny fantasy by a talented new author-and-illustrator team.


Author Notes

Jason Eaton is the editor of thefreedonian.com, a Web site devoted entirely to humor.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Gr. 1^-2. After declaring that it has been roughly wiped on a sleeve for the last time, Jason's nose, Montague, runs away in the night, leaving Jason with an embarrassing shortage of facial features. Taking off in anxious pursuit, Jason winds up on a remote island entirely populated by disaffected schnozzes, where he finds his own fomenting a--wait for it--War of the Noses. In stylized brightly colored cartoons, artist Long depicts Jason with a large, empty space where Montague used to hang out and endows all of the pugnacious proboscises involved with comical stick limbs. Though Jason soothes the irritated Montague with a box of extrasoft tissues, the snoot is on a mission; expecting to be humiliated just as he was before, Jason arrives at school to find that everyone else's nose has taken a powder, too. Is there a lesson here? Maybe not--but after witnessing Jason trying to sneeze and keep his eyeglasses from sliding off, children may agree that their own facial faucets, leaky or otherwise, deserve more respect. --John Peters


Publisher's Weekly Review

Eaton's first outing is a nervy, wordy parody of swashbuckling rescue tales. Grade-schooler Jason wakes up without a nose one morning and a note from the nose, which is fed up with being wiped on Jason's sleeve: "You're a good kid, but I'd prefer we just be friends." Jason's face is round and doughy, and his hair looks like chocolate icing; the nose (which looks too mature for his face anyway) is not an alarming loss. The boy's grandfather (who was "always sticking [his] nose into someone else's business") suggests he head to Nose Island and packs him onto a floating schooner with a sea chantey- singing captain. On the island, Jason discovers his nose, Montague, crowned king of the noses. Though the boy begs him to come home, Montague refuses ("Silence, Former Face!... Now we shall begin the War of the Noses with its first prisoner you!"). The final confrontation parodies Hollywood with a tearful reconciliation, but Jason must still return to school noseless. He worries about taunts, but it turns out his classmates are all noseless, too; Montague has recruited the lot of them. Debut picture book artist Long turns in zany portraits in television animation style; palm trees look like folded paper fans, and the humans and the noses appear made out of plasticine. The sharp-edged humor might puzzle smaller children, but older kids already accustomed to dark cartoons (and not intimidated by the amount of text) may enjoy the ride. Ages 5-9. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 1-3-Who "nose" what would happen if a body part suddenly decided to leave for a better life? Fed up with Jason's careless abuse ("You wiped me up and down your lousy sleeve-"), his nose, Montague, deserts overnight, leaving the boy with odorless food, jeers from his classmates, and slipping glasses. His grandfather tells him to "hitch a ride with the Ship of Lost Things" to Nose Island, where he discovers that his own renegade nose not only rules the current community, but also plans to "conquer the world." Eaton's last pages provide the perfect unexpected plot resolution, while Long's humorous, bold, full-page cartoon art frames Jason's lengthy first-person narrative. A brightly colored fantasy for younger readers.-Mary Elam, Forman Elementary School, Plano, TX (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.