Cover image for Hoop girlz
Title:
Hoop girlz
Author:
Bledsoe, Lucy Jane.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Holiday House, [2002]

©2002
Physical Description:
162 pages ; 22 cm
Summary:
When ten-year-old River, who is crazy about basketball, is not chosen to play in the tournament set up in the town of Azalea, Oregon, she decides to organize a team of her own and accepts the help of her older brother.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
630 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 4.0 4.0 64320.

Reading Counts RC 6-8 3.4 8 Quiz: 36889 Guided reading level: P.
ISBN:
9780823416912
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

When ten-year-old River, who is crazy about basketball, is not chosen to play in the tournament set up in the town of Azalea, Oregon, she decides to organize a team of her own and accepts the help of her older brother.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Gr. 5-7. Eleven-year-old River Borowitz-Jacobs, a sixth-grader in tiny Azaela, Oregon, dreams of playing basketball in the WNBA, just like her idol, Emily Hargraves, also from Azaela. She thinks she's on her way when the new high-school coach announces the formation of a sixth-grade girls team that will compete in a tournament with teams from other nearby towns; the most valuable player in the tournament will get to meet Hargraves and attend her basketball camp. Emily's dreams appear derailed when she is cut from the "A" team, but she gathers together the other rejects, including a wheelchair-bound girl with a terrific outside shot, and forms Hoop Girlz, dedicated to having fun. The setup smacks of yet another version of Bad News Bears, but Bledsoe cleverly avoids most of the cliches, not only by varying the ending but also by injecting lots of against-the-grain subplots, including River's hopelessly uncool parents, artists and latter-day hippies who don't believe in competition and eat bee pollen. The basketball scenes are well constructed and realistic, the humor is fresh, and the characters are believable. Good fun for hoop girls and boys alike. --Bill Ott


School Library Journal Review

Gr 5-7-A contrived plot and two-dimensional characters render this a disappointing addition to the sports-fiction genre. Sixth-grader River Jacobs is passionate about basketball and dreams of some day playing for the WNBA. She tries out for the team that will participate in a state tournament but doesn't make it. After her initial disappointment, she and the others who were cut form a team of their own, calling themselves the Hoop Girlz. There are several threads running through the story, some of which remain undeveloped. River's parents scoff at competitiveness, for example, but their attitude doesn't really impact on the story, and her 14-year-old brother becomes the team's coach, showing the leadership qualities of an adult. Add to the mix a haunted house in the town and its mysterious owner, and a miraculous turnaround in Coach Glover's personality and you have the book's convenient plot. Underlying all are platitudes about perseverance, dedication, and the need to follow your dreams. Maureen Holohan's Friday Nights (Broadway Ballplayers, 1997) is a more enjoyable read.-Renee Steinberg, Fieldstone Middle School, Montvale, NJ (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.