Cover image for Even firefighters hug their moms
Title:
Even firefighters hug their moms
Author:
MacLean, Christine Kole.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Dutton Children's Books, 2002.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 24 x 28 cm
Summary:
An imaginative boy pretends to be a firefighter, policeman, construction worker, and other busy people, but he realizes that it is important to take time to give his mom a hug.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 2.6 0.5 63490.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780525469964
Format :
Book

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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Little Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Big Frank the firefighter, Officer Dave the policeman, Dan the construction worker, Captain Steve the helicopter pilot, and Joe the EMT-these are just some of the people a little boy pretends to be, using common household objects (and his little sister) as props. When he's fighting fires, serving and protecting, and rescuing people at sea, he's too busy to show Mom any affection. Still, she keeps reminding him that even these tough guys hug their moms. Eventually, even happily, the boy gives in. This lively picture book celebrates imaginative play and family togetherness as it pays a subtle tribute to today's heroes.


Author Notes

Christine Kole MacLean has worked as an editor for Scholastic magazine. This is her first book for children.

Mike Reed is the illustrator of Catching the Wild Waiyuuzee , by Rita Williams-Garcia, and several other picture books.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

PreS^-K. A little boy pretends to be a firefighter, a police officer, a doctor, and more. He's such a busy boy that every time his mother points out that even police officers, ambulance drivers, and firefighters take time to hug their moms, he pleads work. Not until he's a garbage truck driver and fishes a special item out of the trash does he allow the happy "customer" to hug him. MacLean really captures how single-minded children can sometimes be, and she gets right inside the fantasy world that allows a tower of couch cushions to become a burning building and a laundry basket to become an ambulance. The story goes on a little too long, but children will have fun looking at the detailed pictures that show the busy boy "at work" and charmingly portray the relationship between him and his toddler sister, who is the typical tagalong. It is her pacifier that he picks out of the garbage, making everyone happy. The dappled artwork has a sturdy feeling that adds a realistic look to the world of imagination. --Ilene Cooper


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 1-In this celebration of the imagination, a busy youngster concocts a series of pretend games, using toys, furniture, household objects, and even his baby sister to complete each scenario. First, as Big Frank, he puts on his protective gear, grabs Firefighter Sally, rushes to a burning building in a hook-and-ladder truck, and uses a long-hosed vacuum to battle a blaze. Next, as Officer Dave, he and Rex the police dog (his sister) place a wagonload of stuffed-animal criminals safely behind bars. As the creative child takes on these and other intriguing roles, his mother asks him repeatedly to pause long enough to give her a hug, but he is always too involved to stop his play. The sought-after squeeze is finally awarded on the last page. The boy narrates his adventures in accessible language that expresses his excitement and provides inventive details. Mom's recurrent request makes a familiar refrain that adds a bit of humor to the story and helps to connect the child's flights of fancy to the everyday world. Mixing realistic images with shimmering textures and soft edges, the artwork extends the text and fleshes out each scene. Golf clubs stuck between an ottoman and an easy chair become the gears of a front loader, a ceiling fan becomes a Coast Guard helicopter, and stacked-up boxes make a perfect rocket. A good pick for sparking pretend play and maybe even an occasional embrace.-Joy Fleishhacker, formerly at School Library Journal (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.