Cover image for K is for kitten
Title:
K is for kitten
Author:
Leopold, Nikia Speliakos Clark.
Publication Information:
New York : Putnam's, [2002]

©2002
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged): color illustrations ; 26 cm
Summary:
A rhyming alphabet book which follows a kitten named Rosie from the alley in which she is found to the "ZZzzs" she enjoys with the family that gives her a home.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 2.1 0.5 64177.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780399235634
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

Rosie is just a scrawny alley kitten, but she's braver than she looks-and that's a good thing, because when a little girl brings her home, Rosie will meet the family dog, confront wild animals, be fooled by her reflection and find herself out on a limb. It will take some time for Rosie to get used to her new surroundings, but she eagerly laps it up, and her new family can't help loving her.

In this charming alphabet book, Niki Clark Leopold and Susan Jeffers join forces to introduce us to a most endearing kitten on her journey of discovery.


Author Notes

Niki Clark Leopold, an author and poet, lives in Ruxton, Maryland.
Susan Jeffers is the illustrator of such distinguished picture books as Three Jovial Huntsmen , a Caldecott Honor book; Rachel Field's Hitty ; and the ABBY Award-winning Brother Eagle, Sister Sky , which was also a New York Times besteller. She lives in New York.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

PreS^-Gr. 2. In this alphabet book, a young girl finds a kitten in an alley and brings it home. "A is for Alley / Where a kitten meowed. / Finally I found her, / Tiny and loud." Short, rhyming verses correspond with each letter of the alphabet and describe the kitten's exciting day in her new home. The text is pleasant if uninspiring. It is Jeffers' wonderful gouache-and-colored-ink artwork, fresh and appealing, that will sell this, especially to children who are animal lovers. The pictures capture the kitten's wild energy and movements, culminating in a quiet ending for the busy little cat, "Z is for Zzzz's. / With love all around her, / Rosie is dozing. / I'm so glad I found her." The pictures also show the interplay between the kitten and other pets in the home (and animals and folks throughout the neighborhood), adding more humor, and the endpapers display the alphabet for extra fun. --Kathy Broderick


Publisher's Weekly Review

A day in the life of an irresistible lost and found kitten unfolds through the letters of the alphabet in Leopold's (Once I Was...) sophomore effort. "A is for Alley/ Where a kitten meowed./ Finally I found her,/ Tiny and loud." Jeffers's (the McDuff books) opening spread details the meeting: a framed panel depicts the curious girl, her mother and their dog leaning between two buildings; a close-up, opposite, reveals the green-eyed tabby surrounded by two pairs of feet (and paws). Enlarged, boldface letters kick off each couplet, which, combined with the illustrations, often convey a playful humor. For instance, for the letter Q, the top panel ("Q is for Quarrel./ Here comes a real cat") depicts a full-grown white cat approaching the kitten, Rosie, while the lower panel (`This is my garden,'/ Says Rosie, `you scat!' ") reveals the true reason for the cat's exit off the right-hand side of the page-Rosie stands between the dog's legs. The cat's antics are so engaging that readers might overlook a few faulty rhymes (limb/again, lives/inside); meanwhile, Jeffers's spot-on illustrations will appeal to animal lovers. Ages 2-6. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-This alphabet book tells the story of Miss Rosie, a kitten rescued from an alley by a little girl. The simple rhyming text describes her adventures and learning experiences from lapping cream or falling into the pond to going to the vet. Each letter is given a four-line verse and highlighted in a larger font in uppercase. The illustrative word can be a noun, a verb, or "Oops" and "ZZzz's." Jeffers's gouache and colored-ink illustrations are enchanting. This feline is a soft, yellow tabby with big green eyes that just about jumps off the page into readers' arms so that they can feel its fur. There are many interesting points to discuss with children, such as the different insects on the "I" spread. The beauty of the book is in its simplicity and veracity. The little girl poised to lap the milk out of the saucer to teach the kitten is typical of a child. Better yet, with yawning girl, kitten, and dog, "Y is for Yawn" makes this a perfect bedtime story. The book is best for one-on-one reading, but the pictures are large enough to use a short rhyme or two in a storytime setting. Preschoolers will love this book.-Marlene Gawron, Orange County Library, Orlando, FL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.