Cover image for All aboard! / by Mary Lyn Ray ; illustrated by Amiko Hirao.
Title:
All aboard! / by Mary Lyn Ray ; illustrated by Amiko Hirao.
Author:
Ray, Mary Lyn.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
Boston, Mass. : Little, Brown, 2002.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 26 cm
Summary:
Mr. Barnes goes on a train trip and enjoys all the sights and sounds of the ride.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 2.4 0.5 67118.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780316735070
Format :
Book

Available:*

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PIC BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Choong. Choong. Choong. Choong. A train slows to a stop at a station. "All aboard!" A little girl and her stuffed rabbit climb on the train as it leaves the city and travels through the day and the night, all the way to Grandma and Grandpa's house.


Author Notes

Mary Lyn Ray was born in Louisiana in 1946. She is a conservationist who worked in museums for fifteen years and as a professional consultant in land protection and historic preservation. She is also the author of several picture books for children including Christmas Farm, Pumpkins, Shaker Boy, Welcome, Brown Bird, and Stars.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

PreS^-Gr. 2. A little girl boards a train and finds it full of animal passengers (including a mole reading Holes). Then a rabbit named Mr. Barnes gets on, and the story follows him as he eats his dinner, goes to bed in the sleeper car, wakes and breakfasts, and watches out the window while the train rumbles across the country. Finally, the train stops in a tropical place. The little girl's grandparents greet her, and Mr. Barnes is revealed to be her stuffed toy (some children will have spotted this already). The story is a bit convoluted, and it seems unlikely that the little girl has no chaperone on such a long trip. But Ray's simple, lyrical text captures the rhythms of a train as it clips along the tracks, while Hirao's vibrant cut-paper and colored-pencil illustrations show the train streaking its way through exciting landscapes. Busy interior views give a sense of the relaxed, companionable nature of a long train journey as well as the off-balance, rattling motion. --Todd Morning


Publisher's Weekly Review

Although the heroine of this tale is never mentioned in the text, Hirao (How the Fisherman Tricked the Genie) shows her waiting at the station with her mother, carrying a stuffed white rabbit in her backpack. Riding by herself on an overnight train to meet her grandparents, the girl finds comfort in imagining that her stuffed rabbit, Mr. Barnes, is a human-sized, confident rider of the rails, and that all the other passengers are animals. Mr. Barnes, dressed in a dapper purple suit, becomes the girl's mentor in navigating the amenities of a sleeper car, proper etiquette in the dining car and passing the time. With pleasingly repetitive, elliptic prose, Ray (Basket Moon) emulates the rhythm of the rails. When a freight car flashes by, it makes a staccato impression: "Boxcar, coal car, tank car, flatcar. Red red yellow green yellow yellow blue green." The child's observations rock back and forth, trainlike, between pretend and reality. For instance, when Mr. Barnes looks out the window, he "likes to see the between. The between where he's come from and where he goes to." Hirao's cut-paper and colored-pencil illustrations take the girl's reveries to their fully imagined possibilities. The train's exterior becomes a silver tube gracefully undulating through rolling countryside and around a glamorous city at night, "strung with lights... like a tug of dreams on a river. Only the engineer sees. And maybe someone who watches, awake, out a window." Here readers view the rabbit and girl companions peering out at a diner, billboards and a yellow cab. The skewed angles of the train's interior comically emphasize how the cramped, swaying quarters creates a dense but genial community of travelers (a giraffe in business attire talks on a cell phone and works on a laptop, a mole reads Holes). Upon the girl's safe arrival, Mr. Barnes shrinks back to toy size; readers, however, will undoubtedly want him to grow again for a return trip-and soon. Ages 4-8 (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 3-"Whoonk whoonk wahooonk. The train starts slow. But then it begins to roll. Long train, silver train-." Soon, a large white rabbit named Mr. Barnes prepares himself for bed, climbs into his sleeper, and lets the rhythm of the train lull him to sleep. Through the countryside and the city, the train rolls on as the passengers awaken. In the dining car, Mr. Barnes orders a carrot muffin, and his fellow travelers, including a small African-American girl in a pink dress who's always by his side, eat their breakfasts as well. The trip and the day continue. A mole reads a book, a pig listens to a Walkman, two hippos take photos out the window. It's only when Mr. Barnes arrives at his destination-a warm spot with palm trees and an older human couple waiting patiently-that Mr. Barnes's true size and nature are revealed. He's the little girl's stuffed rabbit who had become as real as any beloved toy can become during the journey. This clever melding of real and imagined perfectly mimics the sensibilities and perceptions of young children. The sound words, repeated often throughout the text, as well as the swirling, curving lines of the cut-paper and colored-pencil illustrations, blend together well. A great choice for storytimes and lap-time sharing.-Jane Marino, Scarsdale Public Library, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.