Cover image for There was a bold lady who wanted a star
Title:
There was a bold lady who wanted a star
Author:
Harper, Charise Mericle.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
Boston [Mass.] : Little, Brown and Co., [2002]

©2002
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 22 x 27 cm
Summary:
In this variation on the traditional cumulative rhyme, a feisty woman tries roller skates, a bicycle, and even a rocket to reach a star.
General Note:
"Megan Tingley books."
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780316146739
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

There was a bold lady who wanted a star, I don't know why she wanted a star, it seemed too far... In this funny, clever adaptation of the classic song "There Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly," Charise Mericle Harper takes readers on a wacky journey as a feisty, bold lady tries everything from skates, to a bike, to a car to reach a star. Children will love poring over all the details in Harper's magical illustrations.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

PreS^-Gr. 2. Brightly colored illustrations and new words give a lift to an old favorite, "The Little Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly." Harper's bold lady seems much more fun than her predecessors. She dreams big ("I don't know why she wanted a star--it seemed too far"), and she jogs, skates, bikes, drives a convertible, flies a plane, and pilots a rocket, all to reach the star she wants to put in her jar. The art, in acrylic on chipboard with collage elements, is clean and modern looking, with a folklore feel that derives from Harper's use of small patterns--dots, swirls, stars, wavy lines, and other designs--that show up in skies; on lawns, dresses, and houses; and in bright picture borders. Peopled with whimsical characters--among them, a giant caterpillar delivering sneakers; a squirrel with pink spots selling bicycles; and a variety of fanciful birds, snakes, bugs, and mammals--this alternative to an old favorite is loads of fun. --Diane Foote


Publisher's Weekly Review

In this folksy revision of "I Know an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly," an auburn-haired woman in a calico dress looks out her window at a yellow, five-pointed star while her son sleeps under a patterned quilt. The lady fetches some running shoes and roller skates ("She bought the skates to replace the shoes./ She bought the shoes to catch the star./ I don't know why she wanted a star-/ it seemed too far"). She next acquires a car, a plane and a "big rocket,/ then zoomed up and caught the star in her pocket." Using all her modes of transportation in reverse order, she returns to the farmhouse and affectionately presents her son with the star "in a jar. (So it wasn't too far!)" Harper (Imaginative Inventions) populates whimsical land- and cityscapes with fanciful bugs, birds and animals. The bold lady buys a bike from a small pink squirrel, then cycles through a flowery forest; she gets a car from a speckled snake and cruises past quirky shops. For each reiteration of the sequence, Harper provides a rebus alongside her key words. Delicate stippled dots and understated spirals decorate every available surface. These attentive folk-art touches complement the spry singalong verse, while suggesting the heights that love might reach. Ages 4-8. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 2-Yet another variation on the familiar English folk song. This time the protagonist is a feisty, "bold" lady who wanted a star. "I don't know why she wanted a star-it seemed too far." She buys running shoes from a funny-looking caterpillar salesman and runs for miles before stopping for a snooze. Then she buys skates to replace the shoes, a bike to replace the skates, a car to replace the bikes, and on and on until she acquires a rocket to zoom off to catch the star. The imaginative and inventive retelling maintains the rhyme of the original except for a slight change at the end. Acrylic cartoons in bright colors lend a zany feel to this bold lady who lets nothing get in the way of reaching her star, which she puts in a jar ("So it wasn't so far!"). An action-packed read-aloud.-Leslie Barban, Richland County Public Library, Columbia, SC (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.