Cover image for The boy who thought he was a teddy bear
Title:
The boy who thought he was a teddy bear
Author:
Willis, Jeanne.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
Atlanta : Peachtree, [2002]

©2002
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 22 cm
Summary:
A lost little boy is raised by three teddy bears who live in the woods.
General Note:
"First published in Great Britain in 2001 by Andersen Press Ltd. under the title The boy who was brought up by teddy bears."--T. p. verso.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 2.8 0.5 60913.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9781561452705
Format :
Book

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Clearfield Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Collins Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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East Aurora Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Eggertsville-Snyder Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Lancaster Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Williamsville Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Audubon Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Central Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Childrens Area-Picture Books
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Summary

Summary

With a little help from three meddling fairies, a young human baby falls under the care of three roly-poly teddy bears, Big Teddy, Middle Teddy and Little Teddy. The teddy bears are eager to care for their new charge, but what do they really know of little boys?With only the best intentions and a lot of love, the bears set out to raise him, instructing him in the ways of teddy bears. Soon, the transition from boy to teddy is nearly complete. He dresses like a teddy. He sits on shelves and sleeps in cupboards. He walks like a teddy. And of course he is very cuddly.Then one day, a knock on the door turns his teddy bear world upside down. Now he must accept that he belongs to the human world. But will he still be able to sleep in cupboards, play in the woods, and go on picnics? Will he still be cuddly? The answer may lie in the big bear hug he gets from his loving mother.Illustrator Susan Varley's charming illustrations humorously depict the young boy's teddy bear antics in this gentle fairy tale with a reassuring ending.


Reviews 2

Publisher's Weekly Review

Being raised by teddy bears proves a cozy proposition in Willis and Varley's (previously teamed for The Monster Bed) endearing tale of a foundling child. At first, Big, Middle and Little Teddy are clueless "He's hungry. Let's give him some sawdust," Big Teddy suggests. But a trio of forest fairies (visible in almost every picture) keeps watchful eye, and the bears' expertise in cuddling more than compensates for their gaps in knowledge. With a distinctly British briskness that tempers the story's sentimentality, Willis chronicles the boy's mastery of teddy bear skills (walking with swiveling legs, sleeping in cupboards, sporting a red bow tie). Varley's idyllic watercolors, tender without being cloying, depict his life as one big teddy bears' picnic. There's tension when the boy's mother finally finds him "I don't want to be a boy!" he cries but it's quickly quelled when Mom gives him "the biggest bear hug he'd ever had" and invites the whole gang to come home with her. The genuine sweetness of this story is hard to resist. Ages 3-7. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 2-This delightful fractured fairy tale has fairies finding a baby in the woods and delivering him to the Three Bears at a picnic. Following their best instincts, the bears take care of the infant, feeding him, diapering him, and reading him books before bed. Not knowing any human names, they call their little charge "Pinky, because he's pink," "Blinky, because he blinks," and "Dinky- because he's so little." They raise him and teach him how to growl and enjoy a picnic in the woods. As expected, his desperate mother turns up one day and wants to take him home. However, he doesn't want to be a boy; he wants to be a Teddy Bear, hiding in cupboards and playing in the woods. While the ending is a touch weak-the mother gives him "the biggest bear hug he'd ever had"-youngsters will instinctively know that the child will live happily ever after. The text is lively, and the softly colored, clear illustrations give the characters wonderful personalities that will tickle readers' funny bones.-Barbara Buckley, Rockville Centre Public Library, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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