Cover image for Firemouse
Title:
Firemouse
Author:
Barbaresi, Nina.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Alfred A. Knopf, 2002.

©1987
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 26 cm
Summary:
Emulating the fire fighters with whom they reside, the firehouse mice form their own company just in time to save the firehouse itself from burning down.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 3.4 0.5 81721.
ISBN:
9780375822940
Format :
Book

Available:*

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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Childrens Area-Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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On Order

Summary

Summary

This jacketed picture book shows that size is no measure of bravery, even in the face of a raging fire! Mac, a small mouse, is devastated when his tiny home is destroyed by fire. Luckily, he finds a new home at the local firehouse. While there, Mac soon forms a fire brigade with the other mice-despite the fact that the house cat, Suspenders, is always lurking around the corner. Will the brigade have a chance to save the day? - Originally published in 1987, Firemouse features exquisite watercolor illustrations throughout, and a full-color jacket. - A wonderful story about the bravery of firefighters. - The perfect gift for the child who dreams of being a firefighter. From the Hardcover edition.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Ages 5-8. When fire destroys his home in Brooklyn's Best Auto Body Shop, Mack the mouse flees for safety into a responding fire truck. Sitting in the vehicle contemplating his fate, Mack finds himself en route to the firehouse, which he immediately adopts as his new home. He organizes the other seven resident mice into a fire brigade, complete with a fire engine constructed with the expertise Mack acquired at the body shop. Industriously making uniforms and turning their mouse hole into a firehouse, the diminutive probys first-year fire fighters practice all the needed skills: drills that pay off when a fire actually breaks out in the firehouse kitchen while the human fire fighters are out on a call. With the engaging mice's escapades amusingly tucked within detailed, realistic pen-and-watercolor depictions of the on-duty fire fighters, the action-packed illustrations will happily occupy young eyes throughout the somewhat lengthy but exciting tale that is certain to please prospective fire fighters of the primary-school set. EM. Mice Fiction / Fire fighters Fiction [CIP] 86-6178


Publisher's Weekly Review

A mouse named Mack is without a home (it burned up in a fire) and decides to settle at the fire station. The other mice welcome him, although a cat named Suspenders isn't as cordial. The mice form their own fire company, make uniforms, train and build a truck. When Suspenders tries to scare a chubby mouse named Bunk, he accidently starts a fire, and the mice go into action. They triumph anonymouslythe human firefighters don't know who helped them. Set in a snug brownstone section of Brooklyn, this is a story with heart. With its childlike sensibility, it is geared toward the imagination and curiosity of the very young. Barbaresi's watercolors highlight the contrast between the firefighters and their tiny helpers. Ages 4-8. (September) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 1 Barbaresi's story of eight mice who live in a Brooklyn firehouse and form their own firefighting unit fails to capture the imagination. The lacklus ter narrative makes it difficult to be come involved with the characters and what they do; even the climactic rescue scene doesn't generate any excitement. When the soft watercolor and ink illus trations don't include close depictions of human faces, they do possess a busy charm, although the details indicate a fire station rife with potential safety and fire hazards. Firemouse will have only marginal appeal for young readers. Laura McCutcheon, St. Catherine's School, Richmond, Va. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.