Cover image for The simple flute : from A to Z
Title:
The simple flute : from A to Z
Author:
Debost, Michel.
Personal Author:
Uniform Title:
Simple flûte. English
Publication Information:
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, [2002]

©2002
Physical Description:
282 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780195145212
Format :
Book

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MT340 .D4313 2002 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

For professional and amateur flutists as well as students of the flute, this book offers a practical introduction to all aspects of playing the flute. Using an accessible A-Z format, Debost offers a logical and imaginitive work on flute performance that places technique at the service of music on every page.


Author Notes

Michel Debost is Professor of Flute at the Oberlin Conservatory. He succeeded Jean-Pierre Rampal at the Paris Conservatoire National and served as principal of the Orchestre de Paris under music directors Munch, Karajan, Solti, and Barenboim.


Reviews 1

Choice Review

Successor to Rampal at the Paris Conservatory, Debost (Oberlin Conservatory) offers a good-natured compendium of advice on all aspects of the flute and flute playing. The book is particularly strong on such aspects of technique as breathing, articulation, fingering (harmonic and alternative ways to deal with "finger antagonisms"), and more advanced aspects of playing, e.g., flutter tonguing, harmonics, and ghost tones. Repertory suggestions are well considered and adequate, if not exciting. Entries tweak interest by their quixotic order because of the alphabetic nature of their placement. This friendly advice from a distinguished professional performer and respected teacher should be a useful resource for teachers and an excellent reference for students and performers at all levels willing to accept the advice and suggestions of a practitioner who has tried alternatives to the standard methods. It should be read with flute in hand. J. P. Ambrose emerita, University of Vermont