Cover image for Encyclopedia of the Roman empire
Title:
Encyclopedia of the Roman empire
Author:
Bunson, Matthew.
Personal Author:
Edition:
Revised edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Facts On File, [2002]

©2002
Physical Description:
xviii, 636 pages : illustrations, maps ; 29 cm.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780816045624
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library DG270 .B86 2002 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area-Oversize
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Summary

Summary

Known for its extraordinarily rich cultural legacy, the Roman Empire is one of the most studied periods of all history. Encyclopedia of the Roman Empire, Revised Edition provides comprehensive and interdisciplinary coverage of the people, place, s events, and ideas of this remarkable period. Spanning almost 500 years of turmoil and triumph, each of the nearly 2,000 entries has been reviewed and updated to fully reflect the most recent advances in archaeology, historical and literary criticism, and social analysis. New entries have been added on daily life, engineering, science, law, and the role of women in Roman society, among others. Complementing these historical essays are new photographs, maps, tables, and sidebars; new reading lists for major entries; a thoroughly updated bibliography; and a revised index


Author Notes

Aside from his work as General Editor of The Catholic Almanac (the 2nd largest compendium on the Catholic Church) and author of numerous works on religion--including Encyclopedia of Catholic History, Papal Wisdom: Words of Hope and Inspiration from Pope John Paul ll, and The Wisdom Teachings of the Dalai Lama, Matthew Bunson has compiled a variety of reference works. These include Encyclopedia Sherlockiana, Encyclopedia of the Roman Empire, Encyclopedia of the Middle Ages, The Vampire Encyclopedia, and Angels A to Z. He lives in Las Vegas, Nevada.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Like its earlier edition, published in 1994, Encyclopedia of the Roman Empire seeks to provide multidisciplinary coverage of 500 years of "the most important personalities, terms, and sites" of this period. Expanded to 636 pages from 494, the encyclopedia includes nearly 2,000 entries, with new ones covering daily life, engineering, science, law, and the role of women in Roman society. There are also new reading lists for the major entries as well as an updated bibliography, which has increased from 56 items of only secondary sources to a list of nearly twice as many, now including primary sources that were not part of the earlier edition. As in the first edition, entries are arranged alphabetically and range from a short dictionary snippet to longer treatments of 4,000 words or more. Some entries include reading lists, but this convention is not widespread throughout the work. As in the first edition, approximately 60 percent of the entries are biographical. The other entries fall within larger topical categories such as government, society, literature and art, law, trade and commerce, warfare, and religion. Among new entries are China; Clothing; Food and drink, Roman; Law; Transportation; and Women, status of. Expanded entries include Calendar, Christianity, Industry, Legions, and Philosophy. Legions is one of the longest, with eight pages of text, including subheadings for development, training and equipment, organization, camps, auxiliaries, the role of legions in the late empire, and a large table of known imperial legions that includes the dates of their beginnings, founders, and where they were stationed. Other special features of this resource remain unchanged from the first edition: black-and-white illustrations, maps, a chronology of major events, a list of emperors, genealogical tables of the dynasties, a glossary, and an index. The encyclopedia has become a standard one-volume source on the Roman Empire and is a recommended purchase for any library that did not purchase the first edition. As an updated edition, it would seem a worthwhile purchase for academic and larger public libraries because of its expansion by 100 entries and 140 pages as well as revisions to various existing entries, especially regarding the role of women in the empire. Most high-school and smaller public libraries would have to weigh the usage of the earlier edition and needs of their patrons.


Choice Review

Bunson, author of several reference works (Angels A to Z, CH, Oct'96; The Pope Encyclopedia, 1995; The Complete Christie, 2000), offers a slightly revised version of the first edition (CH, Oct'94). Like the first edition, it consists mainly of an alphabetical arrangement of entries, ranging from one sentence to 500 words, about people, places, ideas, and institutions of the Roman world. Appendixes include a chronology, a list of emperors, genealogies of several imperial families, a glossary, suggested readings, and a detailed index. The compiler adds several articles on topical subjects (e.g., transportation, clothing, women) and brief bibliographies of suggested readings after many of the longer articles. This edition includes many new illustrations, city plans, and black-and-white photographs, replacing the line drawings of the first version, though one misses some of the helpful illustrations (e.g., under "toga" and "lectors") that have been dropped. Although most articles have not been revised to any great extent, a few now offer tables or additional information such as the lists of known legions or festivals of the Roman calendar. Written in clear if sometimes breathless style, this revision is an approachable source for beginning students who might be put off by the more sophisticated and scholarly approach of The Oxford Classical Dictionary (3rd ed., CH, May'97). Recommended for libraries that did not acquire the first edition. B. Juhl University of Arkansas, Fayetteville


Excerpts

Excerpts

Known for its extraordinarily rich cultural legacy, the Roman Empire is one of the most studied periods of all history. Encyclopedia of the Roman Empire provides comprehensive and interdisciplinary covergae of the people, places, events and ideas of this remarkable period. Spanning almost 500 years of turmoil and triumph, each of the nearly 2,000 entries has been reviewed and updated to fully reflect recent advances in archaeology, historical and literary criticism, and social analysis. New entries have been added on daily life, engineering, science, law, and the role of women in Roman society, among others. Complementing these historical essays are 80 photographs, 14 maps; tables and sidebars; new reading lists for major entries; a thoroughly updated bibliography; and a revised index. Excerpted from Encyclopedia of the Roman Empire by Matthew Bunson All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

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