Cover image for The fairy's return
Title:
The fairy's return
Author:
Levine, Gail Carson.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York, NY : HarperCollins Publishers, [2002]

©2002
Physical Description:
104 pages : illustrations ; 19 cm
Summary:
The good-natured son of a baker wins the heart of a princess, with the help of a fairy and a magic goose.
General Note:
"Princess tales."
Language:
English
Reading Level:
620 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 3.8 1.0 63668.

Reading Counts RC 3-5 3.5 5 Quiz: 41943.
Genre:
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780066238005

9780066238012
Format :
Book

Available:*

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Central Library X Juvenile Fiction Being fixed/mended
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Clearfield Library X Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
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Collins Library X Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
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Orchard Park Library X Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Boy meets princess, and it's love at first sight. Both laugh at the same jokes. Both are named after birds. His name is Robin, hers is Lark. Could there ever have been a more perfect match?

But alas! King Harrumphrey won't let Lark marry a baker's son. And Robin is betrothed to someone else.

Now toss in Robin's nonsense-talking brothers, Nat and Matt, their versifying father, and Ethelinda, the fairy who wrought havoc in The Fairy's Mistake, and you've got a "nutcrazical" situation!

A hilarious spoof on "The Golden Goose" by the Brothers Grimm, The Fairy's Return is the sixth Princess Tale from beloved Newbery Honor author and master fairy tale reteller Gail Carson Levine.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Gr. 3^-5. Once upon a time, when a young girl asked a librarian for a princess book, she meant a traditional fairy tale featuring a princess. Now, as likely as not, she wants a book from Levine's series the Princess Tales, small volumes that borrow elements from folk-tales to create lively, new stories. In Fairy's Return, a princess falls in love with the third son of a baker, a young man whose jokes make her laugh. With both parents resisting the marriage, it takes determination, imagination, and the intervention of a wish-granting fairy to bring this couple to the point of "happily ever after." For Biddle's Sake introduces Parsley, a sweet-natured girl raised by the fairy Bombina, who struggles with an obsessive drive to turn people into toads. After many years of relative control, she flies into a fit of rage and transforms her beloved Parsley. Only a marriage proposal from a human can return Parsley to her previous form. A few black-and-white drawings illustrate the stories, but the real draw of these attractively designed books is the inventive use of folkloric elements woven into charming, original stories. --Carolyn Phelan


Publisher's Weekly Review

A pair of titles join Gail Carson Levine's Princess Tales series, illus. by Mark Elliott: The Fairy's Return, a spoof on "The Golden Goose"; and For Biddle's Sake, based on a little-known German tale, "Puddocky," about a girl who must put her own magic to work in order to fight off her guardian fairy's penchant for turning people into toads. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 3-6-Light and breezy additions to the series. In For Biddle's Sake, young Parsley is turned into a toad by Bombina the fairy, and must convince Prince Tansy, the long-suffering younger brother of mean twins, to propose marriage to her in order to break the spell. In The Fairy's Return, a princess and a baker's son are infatuated with one another; Lark loves that Robin dares to joke with her, and Robin loves that she enjoys his jokes. Both fathers are against the friendship, and so years pass, until they are 15 and can finally wed after a fairy helps Robin perform three impossible tasks. Elements of various fairy tales, including "The Golden Goose," "Rapunzel," and "Puddocky," make their way into these funny stories. Eccentric and misguided characters abound; Robin's father, who fancies himself a genius poet, comes up with non-rhyming gems like, "Royalty and commoners must never mix./Remember this, or you will be in a predicament." Kids will love figuring what word he should have used in each poem, they'll cheer for the plucky heroines, and they'll relish the fairy-tale endings.-Eva Mitnick, Los Angeles Public Library (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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