Cover image for Broken arrow
Title:
Broken arrow
Author:
Gordon, Mark, 1956-
Publication Information:
Beverly Hills, Calif. : Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment, [1998]
Physical Description:
1 videodisc (108 min.) : sound, color ; 4 3/4 in.
Summary:
Two military pilots engage in a no-holds-barred battle against time and each other in a race to recover two stolen nuclear warheads. When a B-2 Stealth Bomber crashes in the Utah desert during a top-secret test run, the military quickly moves in to retrieve its two "broken arrows." But the situation spins out of control after one of the pilots reveals the crash to part of an incredible nuclear extortion plot.
General Note:
Title from container.

Originally released as a motion picture in 1996.

Special features: Original theatrical trailer; cast/director mini bios.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
MPAA rating: R.
Geographic Term:
UPC:
086162104206

086162162749
Format :
DVD

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
DVD 4012 Adult DVD Open Shelf
Searching...
Searching...
DVD 4012 Adult DVD Audio Visual
Searching...
Searching...
DVD 4012 Adult DVD Audio Visual
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

Hong Kong director John Woo's second U.S. film (his first was Hard Target) delivers a number of exciting action sequences but is let down by a credibility-straining plot. John Travolta plays Vic Deakins, an Air Force pilot on what is supposed to be a routine night flight mission with his co-pilot, the younger Riley Hale (Christian Slater), whom Deakins constantly kids for lacking the "will to win." Deakins is actually a traitor who crashlands their Stealth Bomber in Death Valley so that he can steal two nuclear warheads onboard and sell them to terrorists who plan to blackmail the government. Deakins meets up with his cohorts, who have been waiting in the park, while Hale survives and teams up with a young, attractive park ranger (Samantha Mathis) to foil Deakins's plans. Plenty of action ensues, with car chases, collapsing mine shafts, fights on burning trains, and even the underground detonation of a nuclear device. Despite the script's implausibilities and inconsistencies, Woo amply displays the expertise with action sequences and man-to-man conflict that has made his Hong Kong films cult favorites. ~ Don Kaye, Rovi