Cover image for Mossflower
Title:
Mossflower
Author:
Jacques, Brian.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Prince Frederick, MD : Recorded Books, [2001]

â„—2001
Physical Description:
9 audiocassettes (11.75 hr.) : analog.
Summary:
Martin the warrior mouse and Gonff the mousethief set out to find the missing ruler of Mossflower, while the other animal inhabitants of the woodland prepare to rebel against the evil wildcat who has seized power.
General Note:
Prequel to: Redwall.

Unabridged.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781402506529
Format :
Sound Cassette

Sound Recording

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Audubon Library XX(1190178.23) Juvenile Audiobook on Cassette Audiobooks
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Summary

Summary

When the peaceful land of Mossflower is conquered by an evil wildcat queen, it is up to a heroic mouse, Martin, to save his homeland and dirve her away. The spell of this animal fantasy is irresistible


Author Notes

Brian Jacques was born in Liverpool, England on June 15, 1939. After he finished St. John's School at the age of fifteen, he became a merchant seaman and travelled to numerous ports including New York, Valparaiso, San Francisco, and Yokohama. Tiring of the lonely life of a sailor, he returned to Liverpool where he worked as a railway fireman, a longshoreman, a long-distance truck driver, a bus driver, a boxer, a police constable, a postmaster, and a stand-up comic. During the sixties, he was a member of the folk singing group The Liverpool Fishermen. He wrote both poetry and music, but he began his writing career in earnest as a playwright. His three stage plays Brown Bitter, Wet Nellies, and Scouse have been performed at the Everyman Theatre.

He wrote Redwall for the children at the Royal Wavertree School for the Blind in Liverpool, where he delivered milk as a truck driver. His style of writing is very descriptive, because of the nature of his first audience, for whom he painted pictures with words, so that they could see them in their imaginations. After Alan Durband, his childhood English teacher, read Redwall, he showed it to a publisher without telling Jacques. This event led to a contract for the first five books in the Redwall series. He also wrote the Castaways of the Flying Dutchman series. He died on February 5, 2011.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Gr. 5-7. Although Martin the Warrior never appeared in Jacques' Redwall [BKL Je 1 87], his influence was a propelling factor in the adventure-rich, highly engrossing plot. Now, the author takes readers back to the days of Martin, relating how that brave and resourceful mouse wrested power from the evil wildcat, Tsarmina, bringing peace to the woodland and making Mossflower woods a safe haven. Jacques' writing still resonates with evocative language that skillfully details settings, characters, and numerous escape-and-rescue scenes. He also insightfully sketches moods, and emotions, giving the ongoing drama a solid base for its many conflicts and confrontations. In this prequel, however, the author uses a much broader panorama and bigger cast to tell his story; the rapidly changing scenes and various contingencies result in an overall loss of momentum. Nevertheless, advanced readers who thrive on episodic drama will find Jacques' smooth style and short segments easily accessible, his well- conceived action nonstop. Children who enjoyed the earlier book will welcome this reprise. BE.


Publisher's Weekly Review

Right from the start of this rousingly old-fashioned prequel to Redwall , readers will submerge themselves in the culture of the woodlanders and their council, the Corim, against the wicked Kotir. Kotir is the name of the group holed up at the castle, led by Tsarmina, a wildcat who poisons her father and imprisons her good brother Gingivere so that she may rule in her own way. Into the woodlanders' midst comes Martin the Warrior, who becomes fast friends with Gonff the mousethief and others; they soon set off to find the only warrior who can lead them to victory. More important than the outcome of the story, where good triumphs over evil, are the characters: baby hedgehogs Ferdy and Coggs, doing their valiant best to become warriors; the kindly Gingivere, who finds his heart's joy as a farmer; Lady Amber, the squirrel Chief and her band of archers; Chibb, the robin who will spy for anyone as long as he is paid in candied chestnuts. Martin's heroics pale in comparison to the acts of his fellow-fighters, so colorful are their escapades. While Redwall fans will enjoy this, no prior knowledge of that book is necessary. Illustrations not seen by PW. Ages 10-up. (Nov.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 6 Up In this prequel to Redwall (Philomel, 1987), Jacques describes the epic adventures leading up to the foundation of Redwall Abbey. A band of weasels, stoats, and other unpleasant creatures from Kotir Castle, led by the evil wildcat Tsarmina, is making life unbearable for the animals of Mossflower Woods. Then Martin, a young warrior mouse with a rusty sword, appears and inspires them to resistance. Leaving the others to harass Tsarmina, Martin sets out with two companions on a quest to find the great badger, Boar, the true ruler of Mossflower. All of the characters, good and evil alike, come fully alive. Jacques has the true fantasy-writer's ability to create a wholly new and believable world, down to the last details of food, drink, and local dialect. He is not so skilled with his plot. Suspense does not arise from the situation itself, for the end is never really in doubt. Instead it is produced by rapid and often confusing cuts back and forth between groups of characters. The writing is smooth and swift-paced; scenes of violent battle take place so quickly that readers may have to go back to what has happened. Lacking the unifying device which the seige provides in Redwall, the narrative seems overly long and crowded with events. This will be enjoyed mainly by those whose reading of Redwall has already aroused their interest in Mossflower and its inhabitants. Ruth S. Vose, San Francisco Public Library (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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