Cover image for Trick or treat?
Title:
Trick or treat?
Author:
Martin, Bill, 1916-2004.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers, [2002]

©2002
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 29 cm
Summary:
A child has a wonderful time collecting treats from the wacky neighbors until Magic Merlin decides that a trick would be more fun.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
AD 670 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 2.9 0.5 66990.

Reading Counts RC K-2 3.2 1 Quiz: 52866.
ISBN:
9780689849688
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

Going trick-or-treating on Halloween means a goody bag full of delicious caramel pops, jelly beans, candy bars...until Merlin waves his wand and everything turns "WackBards." Whoever heard of paramel cops, beanut putter, or twicorice lists?

Will the trickster's Halloween spell be broken?


Author Notes

Children's writer Bill Martin, Jr. was born and raised in Hiawatha, Kansas. Ironically, the future early childhood educator had difficulty reading until he taught himself, before graduating with a teaching certificate from Emporia State University.

After graduation, he taught high school drama and journalism in Kansas. He served in the Army Air Force as a newspaper editor during World War II. He wrote his first book, The Little Squeegy Bug, for his brother, Bernard, an artist, to illustrate while recuperating from war wounds. It was published in 1945 and the brothers would go on to collaborate on 10 more books by 1955.

He earned a master's degree and doctorate in early childhood education from Northwestern University and became principal of an elementary school in Evanston, Ill., where he developed innovative reading programs. In 1962 Martin moved to New York City to become editor of the school division of Holt, Rhinehart and Winston where he developed the literature-based reading programs Sounds of Language and The Instant Readers.

Martin returned to full-time writing in 1972 and ended up writing over three hundred children's books during his career. His titles include; Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What do You See?, Polar Bear, Polar Bear, What do you Hear?, The Ghost-Eye Tree, Barn Dance, and Chicka, Chicka, Boom, Boom. He died on August 11, 2004 at the age of 88.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Gr. 1^-3. What seems to be a one-note book with fun illustrations and clever names for kids to chatter aloud takes an inspired jog midway that will keep kids laughing and also put their brains to work. A little boy goes trick-or-treating, promising his mother that he will knock only on doors of the people he knows in the apartment building where he lives. He begins on the second floor, with Knicker Knocker's door, then Slipper Slopper on floor three, and so on, getting treats each time. But when he reaches Magic Merlin's door, treats become tricks and suddenly everything's "Wackbards." He gets Beanut Putter, Ceanut Pups, and Parmel Cops from his costumed neighbors. What's a hungry trick-or-treater to do? Meisel's cartoon illustrations take full advantage of the topsy-turvy story, adding lots of comic holiday detail to keep little ones alert. The fun is in the pictures, and the challenge is in figuring out the visual joke and the backward names. --Stephanie Zvirin


Publisher's Weekly Review

Counting and word games result when a trick-or-treater makes the rounds of his 10-story apartment building. On his way upstairs, the junior Dracula gets Licorice Twists, Chocolate Sticks and so forth, but, on the top floor, a gleeful neighbor in Merlin guise sends him "WackBards!" The boy proceeds in reverse, receiving Stocolate Chicks, Twicorice Lists, etc. Meisel (How to Talk to Your Cat) gamely draws a crateful of chicks, elaborately scrawled lists, etc., and Martin and Sampson's (previously teamed for I Pledge Allegiance, reviewed August 26) expertly cadenced inside-out wordplay could prove habit-forming. Ages 4-8. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 1-3-Martin and Sampson aim their book at children who enjoy hearing, or trying to get their own mouths around, silly words. Trick-or-treating in his apartment house with his mother in tow, a young "Dracula" collects treats on each floor, until a magician on the 10th hits him with a trick: "Now everything is WACKBARDS!" As the child makes all of his previous stops in reverse, instead of Jelly Beans, he gets a stream of "Belly Jeans": likewise, Chocolate Sticks change to "Stocolate Chicks," Caramel Pops to "Paramel Cops," and so on. Meisel keeps the tone light in his spacious, simply drawn cartoons, portraying everyone wearing maskless costumes and, generally, smiling as armies of little blue jeans, police officers, and other wacky offerings march into the lad's apparently bottomless sack. And, it takes only a paternal hug at the end to break the spell, leaving the diminutive Count and his parents happily contemplating a teetering mountain of sweets. Children will giggle, and salivate, too, at this sugary bit of Halloween foolery.-John Peters, New York Public Library (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.