Cover image for Jupiter
Title:
Jupiter
Author:
Miller, Ron, 1947-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Brookfield, Conn. : Twenty-First Century Books, [2002]

©2002
Physical Description:
72 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 22 x 29 cm.
Summary:
Chronicles the discovery and explorations of the planet Jupiter and discusses each of its moons, its place in the solar system, and more.
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780761323563
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Newstead Library QB661 .M55 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Clearfield Library QB661 .M55 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Hamburg Library QB661 .M55 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Kenilworth Library QB661 .M55 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Kenmore Library QB661 .M55 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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City of Tonawanda Library QB661 .M55 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Julia Boyer Reinstein Library QB661 .M55 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Audubon Library QB661 .M55 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Chronicles the discovery and explorations of the planet Jupiter and discusses each of its moons, its place in the solar system, and more.


Author Notes

Ron Miller has worked as a freelance writer and illustrator for more than 30 years. He has written short stories, nonfiction works, novels, and created a comic book. His illustrations have appeared in magazines such as Astronomy and Scientific American. He has also worked on motion pictures and created postage stamps.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 1

School Library Journal Review

Gr 5-7-Miller illustrates two up-to-date planetary reports with a mix of NASA photos and big, amazingly realistic, digitally produced, color images. Jupiter, with its spectacular clouds, recently discovered rings, and array of unique moons, is the more picturesque of the two; as Miller himself notes, the surface of Venus "appears to be much the same over the whole planet," and most of the sere, rocky Venerian scenes bear that out. Still, the eye-catching art and the sober, systematic texts in both of these volumes, backed up by slender but current lists of books and Web sites, will please young planetologists seeking more detail than that provided by the basic introductions of Seymour Simon (Morrow) or Elaine Landau (Watts).-John Peters, New York Public Library (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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