Cover image for Babies
Title:
Babies
Author:
Heiligman, Deborah.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Washington, D. C. : National Geographic Society, [2002]

©2002
Physical Description:
30 pages : color illustrations ; 24 cm.
Summary:
Describes how babies look and act and how they change as they grow.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 3.5 0.5 64453.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780792282051
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Newstead Library RJ134 .H45 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Clarence Library RJ134 .H45 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Clearfield Library RJ134 .H45 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Concord Library RJ134 .H45 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Crane Branch Library RJ134 .H45 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Dudley Branch Library RJ134 .H45 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction STEM
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Eden Library RJ134 .H45 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Eggertsville-Snyder Library RJ134 .H45 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Elma Library RJ134 .H45 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Grand Island Library RJ134 .H45 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Hamburg Library RJ134 .H45 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Kenilworth Library RJ134 .H45 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Kenmore Library RJ134 .H45 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Lake Shore Library RJ134 .H45 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Marilla Free Library RJ134 .H45 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Niagara Branch Library RJ134 .H45 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Orchard Park Library RJ134 .H45 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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City of Tonawanda Library RJ134 .H45 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Williamsville Library RJ134 .H45 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Audubon Library RJ134 .H45 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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On Order

Summary

Summary

The Jump Into Science book, Babies, looks at what babies can and can't do, their development, growth, and more. It follows a newborn home from the hospital under the watchful gaze of his older sister. As she learns, we learn. How fast do babies grow? What do they eat? How do we take care of them? Readers will learn amazing baby facts, such as: Newborns can see only in black-and-white. They taste only sweet, bitter, and sour, but they like sweet best. And, if you kept growing at the rate that babies grow when they're first born, you'd weigh more than a thousand pounds by the time you were five Understanding what's going on with a baby's development will help older siblings look beyond the cooing and the crying. Kids will find out that babies like to imitate and that they learn through imitation. A do-it-yourself activity at the end of the book let's kids be a baby scientist by trying to get a baby to respond to simple gestures and then by recording those observations on a chart. Kids will be surprised to learn that peek-a-boo is an educational game for a baby And they'll see why babies aren't ready for solid food or for walking or talking until they're a little older.The Babies artwork is charming and funny and clearly directed toward an older sibling in the 4-8 age group. It follows one family's baby antics - midnight feedings, trying to guess what the crying baby wants - but it also shows babies of every type and description at the hospital, at the park, and in multiple groups from twins to septuplets


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

K-Gr. 2. Part of the Jump into Science series, this nonfiction title, which looks and feels like a picture book, presents basic information about how babies grow. It is targeted to children in the lower-elementary grades. The text covers such topics as how babies communicate and gather information from the world, why they may look or act like other family members, and how they learn to eat food as they get older. At the end of the book, there is a «Be a Baby Scientist» activity that allows school-age children to practice their observation skills, providing a secret backwards message for them to read with a mirror. A broad view of how babies differ from older children that will inspire appreciation of the first stage of every life. Kathy Broderick.


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 2-This conversational, loosely organized title explores the physical needs and unique characteristics of babies. The focus is on how children develop in their first 18 months, both in size and in ability. General information, such as what infants eat and why they cry, is interspersed with less well-known details, such as the fact that newborns have more bones than adults. The text also touches on the genetic and environmental reasons that babies look and act the way they do, briefly mentioning adopted children and twins. The computer-assisted illustrations feature caricatures of a single family with round, soft faces and big, brown eyes. The color is loud enough to seem artificial. In a few instances, the illustrations don't help clarify the text. For example, in discussing the rapid growth of a newborn, Heiligman explains that, "A baby who weighs 7 pounds when he is born will probably weigh 21 pounds on his first birthday." The accompanying full-page chart starts its graph line at nine pounds, a disconcerting detail for the literal minded. An uneven presentation with interesting information.-Martha Topol, Traverse Area District Library, Traverse City, MI (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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