Cover image for A treasury of miracles for women : true stories of God's presence today
Title:
A treasury of miracles for women : true stories of God's presence today
Author:
Kingsbury, Karen.
Personal Author:
Edition:
[Large print edition].
Publication Information:
Waterville, Me. : Thorndike Press, 2002.
Physical Description:
200 pages (large print) ; 23 cm
General Note:
Originally published: New York : Warner Books, c2002.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780786243747
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
BT97.3 .K56 2002B Adult Large Print - Floating collection Floating Collection - Large Print
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Author Notes

Karen Kingsbury was born in Fairfax, Virginia on June 8, 1963. She received a B.A. in journalism from California State University, Northridge in 1986. After graduation, she became a full-time reporter for the Los Angeles Times. Her first book, Missy's Murder, was published in 1992. She wrote three more true crime novels and four collections of answered prayers and miracle stories before transitioning to inspirational fiction in 1998. Her first inspirational fiction novel was Where Yesterday Lives. Popular series she has penned include the Redemption, Firstborn, Sunrise, and Angels Walking series, and she has also written the nonfiction Miracle Books collection, gift books, and children's books.

She has won several Retailer's Choice Awards, plus 2005 and 2007 Gold Medallions for Oceans Apart and Ever After, respectively. Her other books include Longing, Coming Home - The Baxter Family: A Story of Undying Hope, Fiteen Minutes, The Family of Jesus, The Friends of Jesus, and In This Moment.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 1

Publisher's Weekly Review

This book is indeed for women, if by women one means white, American, middle-class, conservative Christian mothers. But there's little reason to quibble; such women are exactly Kingsbury's target audience, and few of them will be disappointed by these stories of angels, medical miracles and mothers who really, really love their kids (the only exception being a "childless by choice" woman who really, really loves her house). While Kingsbury claims that these stories are true (there's no documentation or opportunity to corroborate this), she has clearly taken liberties with the dialogue; the conversations between doctors and anguished parents are straight out of 1960s-era medical dramas. The majority of the stories fit a pretty old chestnut of a formula: tragedy happens, the doctor says there's no hope, God intervenes (often in the form of an angel), the patient miraculously gets better, then the doctor shakes his head in disbelief, says that the recovery is inexplicable and admits that he was wrong. In more than one case, the wrong medical advice is, not surprisingly, to abort a gravely ill fetus. Two later chapters are a bit more compelling in that the sick person indeed dies, and the miracle is the good that comes from that death. There's little doubt that Kingsbury's subjects had astonishing experiences, but the nuance, texture and reality of those experiences are lost in the simplistic telling. Luis Palau's It's a God Thing packs the emotional punch Kingsbury is going for, but with considerably less treacle. (Apr. 4) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved