Cover image for The language of sisters
Title:
The language of sisters
Author:
Hatvany, Amy, 1972-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : NAL Accent/New American Library, [2002]

©2002
Physical Description:
239 pages ; 21 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780451207005
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library X Adult Fiction Central Library
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Central Library X Adult Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Anna M. Reinstein Library FICTION Adult Fiction Open Shelf
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Ten years after leaving her troubled family behind, unable to cope with life with a disabled sister, Nicole Hunter is drawn back home by tragedy to care for her pregnant sister and to mend her estranged relationship with her mother. Original.


Reviews 1

Publisher's Weekly Review

Yurk's second novel begins when Nicole Hunter receives a psychic distress signal from her severely retarded sister, Jenny. After 10 years of estrangement, she phones her chilly, distant mother, Joyce, and learns that Jenny was raped by a nurse's aide and is pregnant. Leaving San Francisco and her lawyer boyfriend, Shane, she heads up to Washington to survey the damage. She is outraged that Joyce will not consent to an abortion for Jenny, who is unable to speak or care for herself, let alone a child. Nicole moves back into their childhood home to care for her sister and to face old demons, most notably the abuse that Jenny suffered at the hands of their father (who's now long gone), which neither she nor Joyce was able to stop. She reconnects with her childhood friend, Nova, who is both the unconditionally loving mother and the engaged sister she never had. As Nicole's relationship with Shane falters, she conveniently meets Garrett, a handsome divorc with a toddler of his own. Watching Nova nurture her four children, Nicole develops feelings for Jenny's unborn child that force her to make some life-changing decisions. While the novel has serious flaws-Joyce's character is woefully underdeveloped; there are some rather hokey "psychic" goings-on; and the writing is at times just plain bad ("juicy feelings I could barely name")-it is worth reading because Yurk (The Kind of Love That Saves You), whose own sister was diagnosed with Rett Syndrome, so skillfully describes the experience of living with and caring for a person with special needs. Agent, Victoria Sanders. (Sept. 3) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


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