Cover image for A serious but not ponderous book about nuclear energy
Title:
A serious but not ponderous book about nuclear energy
Author:
Scheider, Walter.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Ann Arbor, Mich. : Cavendish Press, [2001]

©2001
Physical Description:
v, 275 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
Language:
English
Subject Term:
ISBN:
9780967694429

9780967694436
Format :
Book

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QC792.4 .S34 2001 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Reviews 2

Choice Review

"The use of nuclear reactions as a source of energy has potential benefits, and potential dangers." This statement is consistent with Scheider's even approach to explaining nuclear energy, explanations often innovatively expressed. In five chapters, he clearly divides the subject into the source of nuclear energy; technology of nuclear energy; other reactors; radioactivity; and risk assessment; an appendix authoritatively details the accident at Three Mile Island, often into minute-by-minute segments. Many of his explanations of relevant phenomena are admittedly brief, a choice that may confuse readers new to the subject; those familiar with nuclear energy should find the treatment refreshingly balanced. Although lightly referenced, most chapters end with well-selected numerical problems, plus solutions. Presidential Award-winning teacher Scheider is a former Harvard biophysicist who has also spent time at the University of Michigan. He most recently served as a high school science and mathematics teacher. Like his previous work (Maxwell's Conundrum: A Serious but Not Ponderous Book about Relativity, CH, Sep'00), the present work is suitable for upper-division undergraduates through professionals. J. G. Morse Colorado School of Mines


Choice Review

"The use of nuclear reactions as a source of energy has potential benefits, and potential dangers." This statement is consistent with Scheider's even approach to explaining nuclear energy, explanations often innovatively expressed. In five chapters, he clearly divides the subject into the source of nuclear energy; technology of nuclear energy; other reactors; radioactivity; and risk assessment; an appendix authoritatively details the accident at Three Mile Island, often into minute-by-minute segments. Many of his explanations of relevant phenomena are admittedly brief, a choice that may confuse readers new to the subject; those familiar with nuclear energy should find the treatment refreshingly balanced. Although lightly referenced, most chapters end with well-selected numerical problems, plus solutions. Presidential Award-winning teacher Scheider is a former Harvard biophysicist who has also spent time at the University of Michigan. He most recently served as a high school science and mathematics teacher. Like his previous work (Maxwell's Conundrum: A Serious but Not Ponderous Book about Relativity, CH, Sep'00), the present work is suitable for upper-division undergraduates through professionals. J. G. Morse Colorado School of Mines