Cover image for Out of the blue : the story of September 11, 2001, from Jihad to Ground Zero
Title:
Out of the blue : the story of September 11, 2001, from Jihad to Ground Zero
Author:
Bernstein, Richard, 1944-
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Times Books, [2002]

©2002
Physical Description:
xiii, 287 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Language:
English
Added Uniform Title:
New York times.
ISBN:
9780805072402
Format :
Book

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HV6432 .B47 2002 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

A gripping and authoritative account of the September 11th attack, its historical roots, and its aftermath Few news stories in recent memory have commanded as much attention as the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, but no news organization rivaled The New York Times for its comprehensive, resourceful, in-depth, and thoughtful coverage. This effort may well emerge as the finest hour in the paper's distinguished 150-year history.In an unprecedented commitment, the Times assigned one of its most skilled reporters, Richard Bernstein, to turn the newspaper's brilliant and incisive reporting into a riveting narrative of September 11th. Following the lives of heroes, victims, and terrorists, Bernstein weaves a complex tale of a multitude of lives colliding in conflagration on that fateful morning. He takes us inside the Al Qaeda organization and the lives of the terrorists, from their indoctrination into radical Islam to the harrowing moments aboard the aircraft as they raced toward their terrible destiny. We meet cops and firefighters, and become intimate with some of the Trade Center workers who were lost on that day. We follow the lives of the rest of America-ordinary citizens and national leaders alike-in the hours and days after the attack.Finally, Bernstein chronicles the nation's astonishing response in the aftermath.No account of this singular moment in American history will be as sharp, readable, and authoritative as Out of the Blue .


Author Notes

The New York Times is the winner of 89 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other newspaper. The New York Times is based in New York City, and has 16 news bureaus in the New York region, 11 national news bureaus and 26 foreign news bureaus.

The New York Times has a 12-month average circulation, which includes 1,131,400 circulated weekdays and 1,682,100 on Sundays.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

Bernstein, a veteran New York Times reporter, correspondent, and critic, as well as the author of five previous books, enlists the aid of the newspaper staff (and utilizes fully credited work by reporters at other news organizations) to prepare this amazingly comprehensive account of September 11. Bernstein's story is not only about the victims, the rescuers, and their families but also about the 19 Arab men who hijacked the planes (with particular focus placed on the group's probable leader, Mohammed Atta). And the knowledgeably told story also includes discussion of the personality and motives of Osama bin Laden. Bernstein castigates a sloppy FBI for its intelligence failures, particularly when it came to the prevention of "elements of a foreign army plant[ing] themselves on American soil with the intention of doing the country harm." Readers will follow the "hatching" of the hijacking plan, in both Afghanistan and Hamburg, Germany, with absolute absorption, and they will realize that the terrorists were banking on the fact that "over more than twenty years of terrorist assaults on the United States, no administration had ever found a strong, effective response." This book is a graphic, reliable weaving together of all facets of the national cataclysm. --Brad Hooper


Publisher's Weekly Review

Veteran Times reporter and book critic Bernstein has drawn on the newspaper's staff reporting of the terrible events of September 11 to create an account that stands out for its poignancy and humanity. Focusing on the personal the victims, the perpetrators and heroes whose lives became tangled in catastrophe the book goes behind the scenes to explore the ways in which so many lives were irrevocably changed. The personal vignettes are emotional without being maudlin, informative without being polemical. We get, for instance, the stunning moment, described with admirable understatement, when Joe Disorbo at the World Trade Center, who "had been too busy surviving to contemplate the scope of the disaster... realized that he was staring into a dusty vacant sky. `Where's the building?' he asked, not quite believing the evidence of his eyes." But the book doesn't stop at the personal. It uses these stories as a jumping-off point for a comprehensive look at the terror attacks the reactions of New Yorkers, the nation and the world; the criticism of U.S. government agencies; the lingering effects of the tragedy. While some of this information has been published elsewhere, it has not been gathered so comprehensively nor has it been written so well. This powerful account deserves to be a bestseller. (Sept. 11) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

New York Times veteran Bernstein takes on the demanding job of transforming the paper's reportage on September 11 into a seamless narrative. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


School Library Journal Review

Adult/High School-Two different yet effective treatments. The quality of the writing and the book's scope make Blue perhaps the best of the 9/11 anniversary volumes. Bernstein focuses on the World Trade Center attacks without slighting the disasters at the Pentagon and in Pennsylvania. His comprehensive view makes the connection between the Islamic fundamentalist hijackers in Pakistan in 1979 and enrollees in Florida flight schools in 2000 and 2001. Firsthand accounts of survivors' escapes from the WTC along with the self-sacrificing courage of others they witnessed mix with sketches of extraordinary lives violently cut short. Such sketches also fill Heroes, a virtual obituary/memorial to the 40 people who died attempting to thwart the actions of four hijackers. Eerily, Longman tells how some passengers opted for the flight at the last minute. His hundreds of interviews allow for both fact and speculation regarding the plane's eventual disintegration into a Pennsylvania field. Both books include photographs of the tragedies and the people involved, relate the last conversations of victims via cell or air phones, and are graphic in parts, all of which make them difficult to get through-but that's precisely why they should be read.-Dori DeSpain, Fairfax County Public Library, VA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.