Cover image for Skeleton hiccups
Title:
Skeleton hiccups
Author:
Cuyler, Margery.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Margaret K. McElderry Books, 2002.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 26 cm
Summary:
Ghost tries to help Skeleton get rid of the hiccups.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
330 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 1.3 0.5 65702.

Reading Counts RC K-2 1.5 1 Quiz: 35469 Guided reading level: G.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780689847707
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

Skeleton has the hiccups.
hic, hic, hic
Ghost tries to help.
hic, hic, hic
But nothing works.
hic, hic, hic
Then ghost gets an idea....
hic,
hic,
hic
HOORAY!


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Gr. 2^-4. Here's a rib-tickler from the author of Roadsigns: A Hare-y Race with a Tortoise (2000), and the illustrator of How Santa Lost His Job. Skeleton wakes up with a case of hiccups that survives a succession of tricks suggested by a ghostly friend: "Hold your breath," "Eat some sugar," "Drink some water . . . upside down." Children will chortle over the inevitable results, as food and water pour out as fast as Skeleton can pour them in. In her bare-bones text, Cuyler establishes a strong, infectious rhythm by sandwiching a "hic hic hic" between each three-or four-word line. Schindler's art is reduced to bare essentials, too: simply drawn figures, minimal detailing, monochromatic backgrounds. At last, a look in a mirror draws a scream from Skeleton that frightens the hiccups away--but not before they have given readers' funny bones a real workout. --John Peters


Publisher's Weekly Review

Skeleton's persistent hiccups prevent him from polishing his bones (his arm jerks loose), carving a pumpkin, raking leaves, etc. "Drink some water upside down," advises Ghost, but the liquid pours out Skeleton's eye sockets. Relief finally comes when Ghost pulls out a mirror and Skeleton scares himself. Cuyler (The Biggest, Best Snowman) punctuates each sentence with a "hic, hic, hic," while Schindler (Big Pumpkin) limns woebegone Skeleton in pale blue-white on elegantly mottled burgundies and evergreens. The illustrations may be spare, but most contain a sly detail or two (check out Skeleton's bat slippers). The commonplace condition and unlikely victim make for offbeat-hic-comedy. Ages 3-6. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-K-This simple story begs to be read aloud. With a recurring "hic, hic, hic," Skeleton attempts the day's business: he gets up, takes a shower, polishes his bones, carves a pumpkin, rakes the leaves, and plays ball with Ghost. When the traditional remedies don't work, Ghost makes a face and shouts "Boo!" at his friend, but to no avail. Finally, clever Ghost confronts Skeleton with a mirror, frightening the hiccups right out of him and sending them "hic, hic, hic"-ing over the hills. With hilarious illustrations that fill the pages, this book will be a treat for children who can laugh at the slightly macabre. Not all youngsters will be comfortable when Skeleton brushes his teeth and hiccups at the same time, jettisoning his lower jaw across the page, or when the sugar falls through his bones and water pours through his empty eye sockets as he attempts to rid himself of the bone-jarring nuisance. However, Schindler's gouache, watercolor, and ink pictures make the most out of each situation, instilling humor in every scene.-Piper L. Nyman, Fairfield/Suisun Community Library, Fairfield, CA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.