Cover image for Run for it : a woman's guide to running for emotional and physical health
Title:
Run for it : a woman's guide to running for emotional and physical health
Author:
Bridson, Karen.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Short Hills, NJ : Burford Books, [2002]

©2002
Physical Description:
240 pages : illustrations ; 21 cm
Language:
English
Contents:
Running, self-esteem, and self-image -- Combating stress -- Fighting depression -- PMS, menopause, and running -- Getting motivated -- Hitting the road -- Zoning out -- Goal setting -- Gearing up, what to wear -- Stretching and yoga -- Weight loss and food -- Injuries -- Safety on the run -- Get addicted -- Racing -- The weather -- Pregnancy and running -- Get even stronger.
Subject Term:
ISBN:
9781580801003
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Angola Public Library GV1061.18.W66 B75 2002 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Kenmore Library GV1061.18.W66 B75 2002 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Audubon Library GV1061.18.W66 B75 2002 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

This book shows how women can change their lives with running. Running can help to combat stress, depression, PMS, menopausal symptoms and more. The book contains chapters on everything from what to wear, what to eat, stretching and yoga, handling injuries, safety, running and pregnancy and many other topics. Woven throughout is the physical, mental, and emotional therapy that the sport can bring -- the joy of running.


Reviews 1

Choice Review

Focusing on the benefits of running while largely ignoring the negatives, journalist Bridson has written a motivational book based largely on sound principles but relying heavily on mass-media surveys of unknown validity and marred by a multitude of minor factual errors and inconsistencies. The book is comprehensive in its coverage, focusing on the psychological, physiological, and environmental aspects of running. The dangers of running addiction are downplayed and even praised. She devotes only one page to disordered eating, a major problem among female athletes, and ignores the female athlete triad (disordered eating, amenorrhea, and osteoporosis). In addition, some of the training advice is incorrect, and the scientific data, when used, are based largely on studies of men (although the examples reveal a subtle anti-male bias). Not recommended for academic collections. D. M. Furst San Jose State University


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