Cover image for A perfect place : Joshua's Oregon Trail diary
Title:
A perfect place : Joshua's Oregon Trail diary
Author:
Hermes, Patricia.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Scholastic, 2002.
Physical Description:
108 pages : illustrations ; 20 cm.
Summary:
Late in 1848, nine-year-old Joshua McCullough starts a second journal, this time recording events in Willamette Valley, Oregon Territory, as his family and others they met on the trail begin to get settled.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
490 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 3.8 2.0 64516.

Reading Counts RC 3-5 3.2 5 Quiz: 31117 Guided reading level: O.
ISBN:
9780439199995
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
J FICTION Juvenile Fiction Series
Searching...
Searching...
J FICTION Juvenile Fiction Central Closed Stacks
Searching...
Searching...
J FICTION Juvenile Fiction Series
Searching...
Searching...
J FICTION Juvenile Fiction Series
Searching...
Searching...
J FICTION Juvenile Fiction Series
Searching...
Searching...
J FICTION Juvenile Fiction Series
Searching...
Searching...
J FICTION Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Searching...
J FICTION Juvenile Fiction Series
Searching...
Searching...
J FICTION Juvenile Fiction Series
Searching...
Searching...
J FICTION Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Searching...
J FICTION Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

In Patricia Hermes's Book Two of Joshua's journey West in 1848, we meet the young adventurer once again upon his arrival in Oregon where his new life will begin.

It is the fall of 1848, and Joshua and his family have finally arrived in Oregon. Excited about their new home, they choose a place to build and raise a farm. Though life out West is trying, and they must cope with losses and setbacks, they also experience great success and joy.


Author Notes

Author Patricia Hermes was born in Brooklyn, New York in 1936. She graduated from St. John's University with degrees in speech and English. She taught English and social studies in middle school before taking time off to raise her five children. When she returned to teaching, she was less satisfied with the job and decided to take a class in writing nonfiction for adults. She wrote essays and nonfiction for adults before she starting writing books for children and young adults.

In 1980, her first book, What If They Knew?, was published. Since then she has written over fifty books and received numerous awards including the Smithsonian Notable Book Award, the C. S. Lewis Honor Award, the American Library Association Best Book Award, and the award for the New York Public Library Best Book for the Teen Years. She also writes The Cousins Club series and novelizations for screenplays including My Girl and My Girl 2. She has also researched and written six historical novels in the Scholastic Dear America/My America series.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Gr. 3^-5. In this sequel to Westward to Home (2000) in the My America series, nine-year-old Joshua McCullough and his family have braved the Oregon Trail and arrived in the Willamette Valley in 1848. Unfortunately, they're just in time for the winter rains and floods, which lead to the accidental death of Joshua's beloved grandfather. Finally, spring arrives with the hope that life will improve. This follow-up doesn't quite stand alone; readers who didn't saddle up for the covered-wagon journey in the first book may feel that they have missed some important details about the characters presented here. But Joshua's brief diary entries are historically accurate and compelling, and he comes across as a believable character with real emotions. Hermes does a particularly good job of conveying Joshua's feelings after his grandfather's death; they serve as a reminder that human circumstances may change with the centuries, but human emotions change very little. --Todd Morning


School Library Journal Review

Gr 3-6-A continuation of the story begun in Westward to Home (Scholastic, 2001). Hermes catches readers up to date as the McCulloughs begins their life in Oregon, deftly introducing Joshua's family and selected members of the wagon train. Details of the life in Oregon Country, where families live in tent cities while facing torrential rains and flooding and work their homesteads when the weather permits, are vividly integrated. Stark realities, such as death from sickness, injury, etc., are included as well. Joshua is a typical nine-year-old boy, wanting to be treated like a man. His beloved grandfather understands him and helps him, but is killed helping others in the floods. Readers of the first book will want to follow up on Joshua's adventures, and those who start with this one will want to go back to find out how it all began.-Sally Bates Goodroe, formerly at Harris County Public Library, Houston, TX (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.