Cover image for The fatal bullet : a true account of the assassination, lingering pain, death, and burial of James A. Garfield, twentieth president of the United States; also including the inglorious life and career of the despised assassin Guiteau
Title:
The fatal bullet : a true account of the assassination, lingering pain, death, and burial of James A. Garfield, twentieth president of the United States; also including the inglorious life and career of the despised assassin Guiteau
Author:
Geary, Rick.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York, N.Y. : NBM, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
80 unnumbered pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781561632282
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library E687.9 .G43 1999 Graphic Novel Central Library
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Summary

Summary

The Assassination of President Garfield Geary explores the first assassination of an American president by an obsessive-complusive stalker, a deluded loser who thought his action would bring him national glory. Once again, beyond a mere presentation of facts, the author surreptitiously unpeels a bit of national American Psyche. Fourth in the popular Victorian Murder series.


Author Notes

An award-winning cartoonist and illustrator, Rick Geary has worked for Marvel Entertainment Group, DC Comics, Dark Horse Comics, and Heavy Metal , and has contributed to National Lampoon and The New York Times Book Review .


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

For his third graphic novel about a famous nineteenth-century murder, Geary chooses the assassination of President James Garfield by ne'er-do-well Charles Guiteau. Geary presents both men's life stories, alternating between episodes of Guiteau's daydreaming and flimflamming and those of Garfield's progress from ploughboy to professor to Civil War general to politician. If Guiteau's sleazy career is more fascinating before the shooting, Garfield's few months of bedridden, painful decline before dying in September 1881 are more interesting after it. But all of the little book is engrossing. Geary surpasses his own bravura in The Borden Tragedy (1997) with superb one-and two-page compositions, subtly expressive facial drawing, and skillful juxtaposition of frames based on stiff nineteenth-century photos and others employing the eccentric viewpoints obtainable with the easily portable cameras of the twentieth century. Moreover, there is low-key wit in the writing, with its slightly overblown diction, as well as in the artwork. This first-rate historical graphic novel happily does not lack the aura of a comic book. --Ray Olson


Publisher's Weekly Review

In this first-rate nonfiction comics work, Geary examines the assassination of our 20th president, James Garfield, murdered barely six months into his presidency by Charles Guiteau, a failed lawyer and demented evangelist. Although the two men never knew one another, Geary focuses on the peculiar similarities in their backgrounds. Both hailed from the Midwest (Garfield from Ohio and Guiteau from Illinois) and were devoutly religious, studied law and gravitated toward politics. But the two couldn't have been more different. Garfield was honest, a brilliant student, a decorated Civil War hero destined for distinction. Guiteau was a misfit even as a child and ended up a deadbeat and a religious fanatic, convinced that he was chosen by God for greatness. Geary's well-researched account also documents how easy it was to gain access to, and the vulnerability of, American presidents in the 19th century. Guiteau secretly stalked the newly elected Garfield (who was given to strolling unguarded around D.C. at any hour) and shot him from behind as he was about to board a train. Geary also takes note of the woeful state of medical treatment at the time. Shot in early July, Garfield finally died in September after suffering through inept and painful attempts by his doctors to remove the bullet. Guiteau was tried and hanged for the murder shortly afterward. Geary's black and white drawings are superb as always in this work, a fitting follow-up to his equally fine The Borden Tragedy. (Aug.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


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