Cover image for Witch twins
Title:
Witch twins
Author:
Griffin, Adele.
Personal Author:
Edition:
[Large print edition].
Publication Information:
Waterville, ME : Thorndike Press, 2002.

©2001
Physical Description:
208 pages ; 23 cm
Summary:
Troubled about being separated at school and preoccupied with sabotaging their father's marriage, ten-year-old witches, Claire and Luna, have little time to think of something good, smart and tricky to do that will finally make them one-star witches.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 4.7 3.0 58694.
ISBN:
9780786243976
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

Troubled about being separated at school and preoccupied with sabotaging their father's marriage, ten-year-old witches, Claire and Luna, have little time to think of something good, smart and tricky to do that will finally make them one-star witches.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Gr. 3^-5. Claire and Luna are fifth-graders, twins, and witches. That last fact is unknown to their family--except their grandmother, who is also a witch. In a plot that's reminiscent of the movie The Parent Trap, the girls are determined to get rid of their father's fiancee, Fluffy. They almost ruin the wedding with witchcraft but use their own smarts to fix things. Along the way, there are plenty of other opportunities for witchy mischief as the girls go through typical fifth-grade experiences--new teachers, the class play--and some less familiar ones, such as rescuing their long-lost grandfather from a time-warp spell. Griffin elevates every genre she writes, and that's true of this satisfying piece of middle-grade fiction. There's all the fun of family hijinks painted with a patina of magic. --Ilene Cooper


Publisher's Weekly Review

Less weighty than some of Griffin's previous novels (The Other Shepards; Sons of Liberty), this humorous fantasy introduces two witches who are identical twins. Ten-year-old Luna and Claire (born 13 minutes apart) may look the same on the outside, but on the inside they are "as different as the sun and moon, peaches and peanut butter, or long division and poetry." Unbeknownst to their parents and brother, both of them have received special powers from a recessive gene inherited by Head Witch Arianna, their grandmother ("Grandy"). According to the "Witch Decree," they are not allowed to cast spells at home, so more often than not, they have to rely on human smarts to solve their dilemmas. For instance, the twins fear that their divorced father's engagement to a "big and loud" Texan named Fluffy could result in their father moving to Houston, so they try (and fail) to thwart the marriage plans. As might be expected, the twins resort to witchery, but the results are never quite what they plan. When their hijinks turns to disaster, they learn it is not always wise to meddle with fate. Readers may find themselves yearning for more magic and fewer moral lessons, but the book has some entertaining moments, especially when Grandy enters the scene. Ages 7-10. (July) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 3-5-Griffin's modern tale bursts with everyday enchantment. Identical 10-year-old twins Claire and Luna are witches, a secret they share with their maternal grandmother and successfully conceal from practically everyone else. Their non-magical parents are amicably divorced and everyone seems to be coping just fine, until their father announces his impending nuptials to another woman. The girls immediately fear the worst and seek their grandmother's help to destroy his relationship; failing at that, they decide to wreck his wedding instead. In the end, the girls understand that mean tricks are futile and unfulfilling and that all the magic in the world can't interfere with destiny. The young protagonists exhibit plausible speech patterns, mannerisms, and concerns. The text is light enough to attract reluctant readers. Young readers will like this story for its breezy mixture of otherworldly witchcraft and ordinary activities. Some elements invite inevitable comparisons to Harry Potter and his world; Claire and Luna exchange correspondence via e-spells instead of an avian postal service, and they travel on a train that has a secret final stop instead of a special hidden boarding platform. Children seeking a spells-and-potions read-alike, however, will hardly regard these obvious similarities as a liability.-Catherine T. Quattlebaum, De- Kalb County Public Library, Atlanta, GA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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