Cover image for Summer light
Title:
Summer light
Author:
Rice, Luanne.
Personal Author:
Edition:
[Large print edition].
Publication Information:
Thorndike, Me. : Center Point Pub., 2001.
Physical Description:
495 pages (large print) ; 23 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781585471447
Format :
Book

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Status
Central Library X Adult Large Print - Floating collection Floating Collection - Large Print
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Summary

Summary

Hailed by the New York Times as an author with 'a rare combination of realism and romance,' Luanne Rice's latsest is the story of May Taylor, a weddingplanner who passes on the timeless traditions of her mother and grandmother. May's own faith in marriage was shattered when she was abandoned by the father of her five-year old daughter. May has made a good life for herself and Kylie, but she's unable - and unwilling - to ever trust another man with her heart.


Author Notes

Novelist Luanne Rice was born in Old Lyme, Connecticut on September 25, 1955. She has written over twenty books and her stories, such as Home Fires and Cloud Nine, depict average people in emotionally complex situations. Many of her novels have been adapted into TV movies including Crazy in Love (1992) which starred Holly Hunter, Bill Pullman and Gena Rowlands, and Blue Moon (1999) which starred Sharon Lawrence, Kim Hunter and Richard Kiley. She currently splits her time between New York City and Old Lyme, Connecticut.

(Bowker Author Biography) Luanne Rice is the author of Follow the Stars Home, Cloud Nine, Secrets of Paris, Stone Heart, Angels All over Town, Home Fires, Crazy in Love (made into a TNT Network feature movie), and Blue Moon, which has been made into a CBS television movie. Originally from Connecticut, she now lives in New York City with her husband.

(Publisher Provided) Luanne Rice is the author of ten novels, most recently Dream Country, Follow the Stars Home, and Cloud Nine. She lives in New York City and Old Lyme, Connecticut, with her husband.

(Publisher Provided)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

May Taylor comes from a long line of wedding planners, but she herself has never had the pleasure, although she does have her wonderful daughter, Kylie, a special child who seems to feel things more deeply than others and who sees angels. It's Kylie who brings her mother and Bruins hockey star, Martin Cartier, together. For Martin, it's love at first sight, but May is leery of relationships. She finally agrees to marriage, but life is complicated as their careers require that they live alternately in Connecticut, Canada, and Boston. May is perceived as manipulating the NHL hunk into marriage by the press and fans, while Martin struggles within the shadow of his famous estranged father, Serge, a three-time Stanley Cup champion who squandered his fortune and family with his gambling obsession. With her gift, Kylie tries to unite the family in the face of tragedy, and the prolific Rice skillfully blends romance with magic. --Patty Engelmann


Publisher's Weekly Review

Few romance authors are able to portray the complex and contradictory emotions that bind family members as effortlessly as Rice (Firefly Beach, etc.), and in this enchanting, heartfelt tale, she showcases her considerable talent. Wedding planner May Taylor has suffered her share of life's blows. Both her parents died when she was young; her first love turned out to be married; and her six-year-old daughter, Kylie, claims to see angels. Nevertheless, May has managed to build a rewarding life for herself in Black Hall, Conn. When fate lands her on a plane with famed Boston Bruins hockey player Martin Cartier, she realizes how desperately she needs a soul mate and Kylie needs a father. The romance between May and Martin is swift but satisfying, and their lives seem almost perfect until Martin is forced to confront the ghosts of his past and the realization that he is going blind. Martin's blindness is symbolic of his lack of insight into his relationship with his father, Serge, a former hockey star who is serving hard time for gambling. Martin blames the older man for the accidental death of Martin's daughter, Natalie, and refuses to answer Serge's appeals. But the tragedy weighs heavily on Martin's conscience and, with May's guidance, he slowly learns to forgive and to have faith in those who love him. A warm and illuminating summer read, this poignant tale of love, loss and reconciliation will have readers hitting the bookstores on the way to the beaches. (July 3) Forecast: A national television and radio advertising campaign as well as print advertising in People, First for Women and USA Today will ensure that sales of Rice's newest will exceed its 75,000 initial print run. The book will also receive a boost from the television adaptation of Rice's Follow the Stars Home (which will air in May) and the May release of Firefly Beach (Forecasts, Apr. 16). (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

Another fraught tale from Rice. Deserted by her father as a child, May works as a wedding planner and raises daughter Kylie, who can see and hear things others can't. This gift leads May to the love of her life, a seemingly smooth but ultimately enraged hockey player who really needs her help. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Excerpts

Excerpts

The plane was crowded. As the passengers boarded, the flight attendant announced that every seat would be required, that people should stow all their belongings in the overhead bins or under the seats in front of them. May Taylor made sure her and Kylie's bags were out of the way, that Kylie knew she had to stay in her place and not bother the businessman in the aisle seat. Takeoff was smooth, and the plane climbed through thin gray clouds into the brilliant blue. Until this year, May hadn't flown much -- she had never had much reason. But Kylie's doctor in Boston had recommended that Kylie take part in a study at Twigg University in Toronto, with a group of psychologists focusing on clairvoyance and personality disorders. May and Kylie lived with May's great-aunt in an old farmhouse on the Connecticut shoreline. May loved her daughter more than anything, but as she looked around the plane, she couldn't help noticing all the couples. The white-haired couple sharing the newspaper; the young professionals in his-and-her suits, talking on cell phones; two parents with their teenaged kids across the aisle. May stared at the parents for a few minutes, wondering how it would feel to have someone to share the care of Kylie with: to travel with, laugh with, worry with. She watched the woman bend toward her husband, her hair brushing his shoulder as she whispered in his ear. His lips turned up in a wide smile, and he bowed his head, nodding in agreement. May suddenly felt as if she'd swallowed a fishbone, and she quickly looked down. She had a sheaf of papers from Dr. Ben Whitpen at the Twigg University Department of Psychology to read, reports and observations and recommendations, all pertaining to Kylie. Upon landing at Logan, she would take them to Kylie's doctor on Barkman Street. After that, the long drive home to Connecticut lay ahead. She stared at the letterhead, at the confusing and worrisome words swimming together, and the ache in her throat grew worse. "Mom?" Kylie asked. "What, honey?" "Big men." Thinking Kylie meant the passenger sitting next to her, May immediately leaned close to Kylie's ear. When Kylie got involved with people, they sometimes got upset. And May could tell by the man's expensive suit, his heavy gold watch, and the fancy briefcase he'd placed in front of Kylie instead of his own seat, that he was one of the ones who might get upset. "The man's working," May whispered. "Don't bother him." "No," Kylie whispered back, shaking her head. "In the special compartment -- really big men. Are they giants?" May and Kylie were in the first row, but Kylie was staring through the half-open curtain separating economy and business class. Kylie was right: Several huge guys were sitting up there, talking to a semicircle of pretty female flight attendants. Their strength was apparent in the size of their chests and arms, the breadth of their shoulders. Some of them had logos on the sleeves of their shirts, and May figured they belonged to some team or other. The women were laughing, one of them saying she loved hockey and could she have an autograph. May, knowing nothing about hockey, turned her attention back to Kylie. "They're just men," May said. "Not giants." "Big, though," Kylie said. "Yes," May said. "Big." She thought of the word "big," of how it could mean so many things. Kylie's father was big -- over six feet tall. He was a lawyer in Boston, in one of the prestigious firms with offices in a skyscraper overlooking the harbor -- a big attorney. He had seemed to love May until she told him she was pregnant, and then he had told her he was married to someone else -- a big problem. He sent her money every month, enough to feed and clothe Kylie -- but he didn't want to know their daughter. That Excerpted from Summer Light by Luanne Rice All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

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