Cover image for How to run successful projects III : the silver bullet
Title:
How to run successful projects III : the silver bullet
Author:
O'Connell, Fergus.
Personal Author:
Edition:
[New edition], third edition.
Publication Information:
Harlow, England ; New York : Addison-Wesley, [2001]

©2001
Physical Description:
xxix, 322 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
General Note:
Rev. ed. of: How to run successful projects II. 2nd ed. 1996.
Language:
English
Subject Term:
ISBN:
9780201748062
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

The essential elements of project success packaged in an easy to apply and common sense approach which thousands of readers will attest works.


Author Notes

Fergus O’Connell graduated with a First in Mathematical Physics from University College Cork.

Since founding ETP (Eyes on the Prize), his own project management company, in 1992, he has taught thousands of managers in his unique seminars and worked with major corporations around the world. With 24 years in the computer industry, 21 spent in project management roles, this best-selling author wrote the highly-regarded book How to Run Successful High-Tech Project-Based Organizations (Artech House, 1999).

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Table of Contents

Preface to the new editionp. xvii
Preface to the second editionp. xviii
Preface to the first editionp. xxi
About the authorp. xxiii
Introductionp. xxiv
Part 1 Analyzing and Planning Projectsp. 1
The nature of projectsp. 1
Structured project management: the Ten Stepsp. 2
Chapter 1 Step 1: Visualize the Goal; Set Your Eyes on the Prizep. 7
Introductionp. 7
Identifying the goalp. 7
Defining the goalp. 7
The reason for the goalp. 8
Motivating the teamp. 9
Changes to the goal and change controlp. 9
Ways of visualizing the goalp. 11
Visualization checklistp. 11
The and-they-all-lived-happily-ever-after methodp. 12
Application to software engineeringp. 13
PSI contributionp. 16
Chapter 2 Step 2: Make a List of the Jobs to Be Donep. 18
Introductionp. 18
Making a checklistp. 19
Identifying the jobs with Form 1p. 20
Application to software engineeringp. 20
PSI contributionp. 27
Chapter 3 Step 3: There Must Be One Leaderp. 37
Introductionp. 37
Case Study 1

p. 38

Case Study 2

p. 38

Case Study 3

p. 39

Case Study 4

p. 39

A role modelp. 39
Application to software engineeringp. 40
PSI contributionp. 42
Chapter 4 Step 4: Assign People to Jobsp. 43
Introductionp. 43
Each job has a namep. 43
People's other commitmentsp. 44
Monolithic team or flat structurep. 47
Hierarchy or team structurep. 47
Maximize strengthsp. 48
Assigning people to jobsp. 48
Case Study 5

p. 50

Assigning people to jobs with Form 2p. 51
Application to software engineeringp. 51
PSI contributionp. 52
Chapter 5 Step 5: Manage Expectations, Allow a Margin for Error, Have a Fallback Positionp. 57
Introductionp. 57
Contingency: allow a margin for error, have a fallback positionp. 57
Manage expectationsp. 60
A word on committingp. 62
Case Study 6 Manage expectationsp. 63
Case Study 7 Allow a margin for errorp. 64
Case Study 8 Have a fallback positionp. 64
Case Study 9

p. 65

Application to software engineeringp. 65
PSI contributionp. 67
Part 2 Reviewing And Implementing the Plan; Achieving The Goalp. 69
Introductionp. 69
Application to software engineeringp. 71
Steps 1-5 Significance of PSI at this pointp. 73
Chapter 6 Step 6: USE An Appropriate Leadership Stylep. 75
Introductionp. 75
The Lazy Project Managerp. 78
Application to software engineeringp. 81
PSI contributionp. 82
Chapter 7 Step 7: Know What's Going onp. 83
Introductionp. 83
Using your plan as instrumentation/The Lazy Project Manager's dayp. 83
Positive signsp. 86
Negative signsp. 88
Application to software engineeringp. 91
PSI contributionp. 92
Chapter 8 Step 8: Tell People What's Going Onp. 93
Introductionp. 93
Status reportsp. 94
The Lazy Project Manager's weekp. 98
A variation on the Lazy Project Manager's weekp. 99
Application to software engineeringp. 100
PSI contributionp. 100
Chapter 9 Step 9: Repeat Steps 1-8 Until Step 10p. 102
Introductionp. 102
When should we update the plan?p. 102
Application to software engineeringp. 103
Chapter 10 Step 10: The Prizep. 110
The Prizep. 110
The reckoningp. 110
PSI thresholdsp. 111
The Second Law of Project Managementp. 112
Application to software engineeringp. 112
PSI contributionp. 112
Part 3 Running Multiple Projects Simultaneouslyp. 115
Chapter 11 The Lazy Project Manager's Monthly Routinep. 117
Introductionp. 117
Project manager's monthly routinep. 117
Chapter 12 Project Manager's Weekly Routinep. 120
Introductionp. 120
Specific weekly jobsp. 121
Chapter 13 Project Manager's Daily Routinep. 122
Introductionp. 122
Part 4 How to Assess Project Plansp. 125
Chapter 14 Assessing Project Plansp. 127
Introductionp. 127
First level checksp. 128
Second level checksp. 138
Third level checksp. 143
Case Study 10

p. 145

Case Study 11

p. 149

Case Study 12

p. 152

Guidelines for writing project plansp. 157
Part 5 The Rest of the Wherewithalp. 159
Chapter 15 Resolving Issues: Problem Solving and Decision Makingp. 161
Introductionp. 161
Problem-solving methodp. 161
Chapter 16 Coping with Stressp. 171
Introductionp. 171
Ways to reduce stressp. 172
Chapter 17 Picking the Right Peoplep. 175
Introductionp. 175
Method of interviewingp. 175
Interview questionsp. 176
Chapter 18 Negotiationp. 178
Introductionp. 178
Principled negotiationp. 178
Chapter 19 Meetingsp. 181
Introductionp. 181
The meeting alarmp. 181
Organizing and running meetingsp. 182
Chapter 20 Presentationsp. 183
Introductionp. 183
Chapter 21 Shortening Projects Using Accelerated Analysis and Designp. 185
Introductionp. 185
What takes the time?p. 185
How to carry out an AADp. 186
Risks in holding an AADp. 187
Practical considerationsp. 188
Afterword: Delegation (or the Real Joy of Management)p. 191
Appendicesp. 193
Appendix 1 ISO 9000 Estimating Procedurep. 195
Introductionp. 195
1. Work breakdown structure, effort, task dependenciesp. 195
2. Availability of resourcesp. 197
3. The project modelp. 198
4. Build in contingencyp. 198
5. Identify optionsp. 200
6. The preferred optionp. 200
7. Sample WBSp. 201
Appendix 2 Structured Project Management (the Ten Steps) and Methodologiesp. 208
Introductionp. 208
Appendix 3 Probability of Success Indicatorp. 210
Introductionp. 210
Calculating a project's PSIp. 210
How to calculate the PSIp. 210
Appendix 4 Basic Precepts and Glossary of Termsp. 223
Introductionp. 223
The Four Big Onesp. 223
Abbreviations and rules of thumbp. 224
Critical pathp. 226
Glossary of general project management termsp. 228
Appendix 5 Additional Formsp. 231
The estimating score cardp. 232
The change request formp. 233
Change request logp. 234
Appendix 6 Learning Microsoft Project 2000p. 235
Introductionp. 235
Module 1 Basics of project managementp. 235
Module 2 Getting started with MS Projectp. 236
Module 3 Menus of MS Project 2000p. 238
Module 4 Setting defaults for your projectp. 241
Module 5 Creating tasksp. 243
Module 6 Entering task durationsp. 247
Module 7 Using Helpp. 251
Module 8 Using viewsp. 255
Module 9 Setting task dependenciesp. 259
Module 10 Using organization and project calendarsp. 266
Module 11 Outlining tasksp. 269
Module 12 Printing viewsp. 273
Module 13 Assigning resourcesp. 278
Module 14 Optimizing the schedulep. 286
Module 15 Resource levelingp. 288
Module 16 Using the baselinep. 294
Module 17 Updating to reflect actual progressp. 295
Module 18 Multiple projectsp. 299
Module 19 Using reportsp. 302
References and further readingp. 304
Indexp. 307