Cover image for No zombies allowed
Title:
No zombies allowed
Author:
Novak, Matt.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Atheneum Books for Young Readers, [2002]

©2002
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 26 cm
Summary:
As they look at photographs of their previous year's Monster Party, two witches begin to exclude zombies, ghosts, and vampires to avoid problems, but finally decide that a party is more fun when everyone is included.
General Note:
"A Richard Jackson book."
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 3.2 0.5 64462.
ISBN:
9780689841309
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
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Alden Ewell Free Library PIC BK Juvenile Fiction Holiday
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Clarence Library PIC BK Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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Clearfield Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Eggertsville-Snyder Library PIC BK Current Holiday Item Holiday
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Hamburg Library PIC BK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Hamburg Library PIC BK Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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Orchard Park Library PIC BK Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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Williamsville Library PIC BK Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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Audubon Library PIC BK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Frank E. Merriweather Library PIC BK Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Monsters can be so annoying.Just ask Witch Wizzle and Witch Woddle.They will tell you horror stories about the nasty habits and bad manners ofzombies,werewolves,swamp creatures,ghosts,skeletons,and vampires.Now it's Halloween again. Wizzle and Woddle are planning another party -- but who will they invite?


Reviews 2

Publisher's Weekly Review

Novak (The Pillow War) turns the habits of zombies, witches, werewolves and other creatures from haunting to hilarious in this tale of an annual monster bash. As wart-nosed and pop-eyed witches Wizzle and Woddle prepare to host the party, they discover photos from last year's soiree that make them reconsider the guest list. "Those zombies kept dropping their eyes into the punch bowl," they recall, and "the skeletons kept calling everyone Fatso." The pair posts one sign after another ("No zombies allowed"). Whimsically patterned spreads reminiscent of Tedd Arnold's work depict enlarged snapshots of their friends' shenanigans against backgrounds of Pepto-Bismol pink and scaly green. Two cartoon-like zombies-one holding his eyeball and the other with only a tattered sleeve where an arm should be-mug for the camera in one; in another, swamp creatures party in the toilet and tub. But when the witches recognize each other as the culprits in a pair of pranks, the guest list grows once again, and a fun punchline offers a clever coda. Novak skillfully balances the gruesome factor with a spoof on spookiness while delivering a message about acceptance and tolerance with a very light touch. Ages 3-6. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 2-Witch Wizzle and Witch Woddle's annual monster bash is plagued by party planning's primary predicament: the guest list. Looking at photos that help them recall a slew of unsavory incidents from the previous year, the hostesses decide to ban former guests, such as the zombies for dropping their eyeballs into the punch bowl and the werewolves for coughing up furballs. Also struck from the invitation list: swamp creatures, skeletons, ghosts, and vampires. Still on the banning bandwagon, the two set their sights on a couple of witches that had turned their guests into frogs. But pictures don't lie, and they discover that the spell casters were none other than themselves. Novak's fondness for silliness is put to good use in his dual role as author and illustrator. The text is engaging, the dialogue is ironic, and the characters are true to form. The watercolor illustrations are bright and eye-catching, and the cheerfully depicted creatures will be nonthreatening to the youngest listeners. New readers will find plenty of white space around the text to help them focus on the words, with the art complementing the action. The two witches learn a good lesson about the social hazards of being exclusionary: it takes all kinds to make the monster world go around, even zombies and werewolves.-Carol L. MacKay, Camrose Public Library, Alberta, Canada (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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