Cover image for When mammoths walked the earth
Title:
When mammoths walked the earth
Author:
Arnold, Caroline.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Clarion Books, [2002]

©2002
Physical Description:
40 pages : color illustrations ; 27 cm
Summary:
Describes the physical characteristics, known habits, and fossil sites of mammoths, prehistoric animals closely related to the elephant.
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
NC 1210 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 7.9 1.0 66483.
Added Author:
Electronic Access:
Publisher description http://www.loc.gov/catdir/description/hm021/2001047192.html
ISBN:
9780618096336
Format :
Book

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QE882.P8 A76 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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QE882.P8 A76 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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QE882.P8 A76 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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QE882.P8 A76 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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QE882.P8 A76 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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QE882.P8 A76 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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QE882.P8 A76 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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QE882.P8 A76 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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QE882.P8 A76 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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QE882.P8 A76 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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QE882.P8 A76 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

Growing to weights of 10 tons and distinguished by enormous curling tusks, mammoths were the largest land animals of the Ice Age. Today, discoveries of mammoth fossils--in places ranging from tar pits and sinkholes to frozen tundra and the bottom of the sea--are expanding our view into the lives of these fascinating giants. In this meticulously researched, clear, and accessible book, award-winning nonfiction author Caroline Arnold describes the natural history of mammoths, highlighting their physical features and adaptation to the environment. Laurie Caple's stunning, scientifically accurate watercolors complement the text and provide an intriguing look at these huge creatures and what the world was like at the time when mammoths walked the earth. Index.


Author Notes

Caroline Arnold always loved books, but as a child she never thought of writing as a career. Born in Pittsburgh, she grew up in Minneapolis and studied art at Grinnell College and the University of Iowa. It was only after my children were born that I became acquainted with children's books and it occurred to me that I could use my training to become a children's book illustrator. I soon realized that I needed a text to go with the pictures, and the more I wrote, the more I realizedthat I liked writing as much as or more than drawing. I've always been fascinated by the natural world and love to go to the parks and museums. Perhaps that is why so many of my books are about scientific topics." Arnold is now the award-winning author of more than 100 books for children. She lives in Los Angeles with her husband, a neuroscientist, and teaches writing at UCLA Extension. For more information visit www.carolinearnoldbooks.com."


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Gr. 3^-5. New discoveries of mammoth fossils continue to tell us more about the behavior and world of these fascinating beasts. Arnold introduces the subject in six accessible chapters that consider the first and last mammoths, their relatives, and the value of mammoths to prehistoric peoples. The information is brief but thorough, with realistic watercolor illustrations depicting the giant animals and their surroundings. Scientific names appear in italics, and pronunciation guides are in parentheses. In contrast to the ecological approach in Aliki's Wild and Wooly Mammoths (1996), the emphasis here is how researching mammoth bones helps us learn about the animals' behavior, surroundings, and the reasons they became extinct. An informative presentation, not overly scientific in tone and sure to appeal. --Julie Cummins


School Library Journal Review

Gr 2-5-After a brief explanation of the Ice Age, the team that created Giant Shark (2000) and Dinosaurs with Feathers (2001, both Clarion) introduces the various mammoths and their relatives and then describes some of the most important fossil finds and what scientists have learned from them. Arnold doesn't shy away from the difficult names and vocabulary required by this topic, but her clear explanations aid readers in understanding the time period, the relationships among the various species, and the scientific processes involved in studying fossils. Caple's watercolors are realistic, detailed, and surprisingly beautiful. A soft sunset behind a row of traveling mastodons, the hint of a stand of evergreens glimpsed through snow and mist, the glow of torchlight on the face of a prehistoric painter all draw readers into the mystery of these lost animals and the humans who saw them. An index makes this a useful research tool, but fans of prehistoric mammals will read the book cover to cover. Barbara Hehner's Ice Age Mammoth (Crown, 2001) covers some similar information but focuses on the discovery of the Jarkov mammoth.-Ellen Heath, Orchard School, Ridgewood, NJ (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.