Cover image for The rabbit and the dragon king : based on a Korean tale
Title:
The rabbit and the dragon king : based on a Korean tale
Author:
San Souci, Daniel.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
Honesdale, Pa. : Boyds Mills Press, 2002.
Physical Description:
32 unnumbered pages : color illustrations ; 29 cm
Summary:
Ancient Korean folk tale of the dragon king, ruler of the ocean, who is convinced that eating the heart of a rabbit will cure what ails him.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
AD 620 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 5.0 0.5 60693.

Reading Counts RC K-2 3.7 2 Quiz: 33358 Guided reading level: N.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9781563978807
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
PZ8.1.S225 RA 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Childrens Area
Searching...
Searching...
PZ8.1.S225 RA 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Fairy Tales
Searching...
Searching...
PZ8.1.S225 RA 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Fairy Tales
Searching...
Searching...
PZ8.1.S225 RA 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Fairy Tales
Searching...
Searching...
PZ8.1.S225 RA 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Searching...
PZ8.1.S225 RA 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Searching...
PZ8.1.S225 RA 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

The Dragon King rules the ocean deep and all its creatures. He is a great king--but an even greater hypochondriac. Though his physician can find neither cause nor cure for his latest ailment, the king believes he is not long for this world. After consulting with his court magician, the king is convinced that eating the heart of a rabbit will cure what ails him. Turtle volunteers to swim ashore and tricks a rabbit into visiting the undersea palace. When the rabbit comes face to face with theDragon King and learns her fate, she shows that she has a few tricks of her own. Daniel San Souci's splendid retelling finds new riches in an ancient tale that was recorded as early as A.D. 642 during Korea's Shila Dynasty. Eujin Kim Neilan's breathtaking paintings depict a magical, underwater world, where dragons, and turtles, and rabbits mingle on the ocean floor. From the author and illustrator of In the Moonlight Mist comes a stunning new version of one of Korea's best-loved folk-tales.


Author Notes

Daniel San Souci was born in San Franciscoin 1948, and grew up across the Bay in Berkeley, California. He attended the California College of Arts and Crafts in Oakland, California.

In 1978, Daniel illustrated his first book, The Legend of Scarface, A Blackfeet Indian Tale, which his brother Robert retold. San Souci is especially highly regarded for his detailed portraits of wildlife. He teaches graduate students at the Academy of Art College in San Francisco, where he is also a member of the Advisory Board. San Souci has won numerous awards, including the New York Times Best Illustrated Children's Book for The Legend of Scarface, NSTA-CBC and American Bookseller awards for North Country Night, which he also wrote, and many others.

Over his twenty-year career as an author and illustrator, he has published nearly fifty children's books, including thirteen with his brother, Robert.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Publisher's Weekly Review

As they did with In the Moonlight Mist, Daniel San Souci and illustrator Eujin Kim Neilan team up for another retelling of a Korean folktale, The Rabbit and the Dragon King. Here, a hypochondriacal king is convinced that eating a rabbit's heart will cure his fatal illness. But the rabbit doesn't want to die, either, and his clever ploy not only saves his life, it makes the king believe he has cheated death. (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 1-4-San Souci's adaptation of this traditional Korean tale is more elaborate than the spare version in Suzanne Crowder Han's The Rabbit's Escape (Holt, 1995; o.p.). Her tale is also more faithful to its roots, with the Dragon King requiring the rabbit's liver for his cure. Here it is the rabbit's heart that he must have in order to survive. The story's wordy setup includes a joking reference to yet another strain of folklore as the turtle volunteers to lure the rabbit undersea. "I am- the only creature here who even knows what a rabbit looks like, seeing how it was my grandfather who beat one in a race many years ago!" Neilan melds Eastern and Western elements in her deep-hued paintings of the watery kingdom. At the outset the impressive Dragon King has Asian features, though later he sometimes resembles a Mardi Gras character. Both author and illustrator add humorous innuendo and bits of drama as the turtle sets out on his search and then persuades the rabbit to be taken to the bottom of the sea. The story survives its slow beginning, building nicely as the rabbit embarks on the underwater journey as adventure and then reaches the understanding that she is expected to die for the cause. Her final ploy will remind children of other familiar trickster tales, and storytellers will find attractive material in the repartee, the scheme of events, and the three sturdy characters.-Margaret Bush, Simmons College, Boston (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.