Cover image for The little match girl
Title:
The little match girl
Author:
San José, Christine.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
Honesdale, Pa. : Boyds Mills Press, 2002.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 29 cm
Summary:
The wares of the poor little match girl illuminate her cold world, bringing some beauty to her brief, tragic life.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 3.5 0.5 60642.
Genre:
ISBN:
9781590780008
Format :
Book

Available:*

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PZ8.S23 LI 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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PZ8.S23 LI 2002 Juvenile Current Holiday Item Childrens Area-Holiday
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PZ8.S23 LI 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Fairy Tales
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PZ8.S23 LI 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Fairy Tales
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PZ8.S23 LI 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Fairy Tales
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PZ8.S23 LI 2002 Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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PZ8.S23 LI 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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PZ8.S23 LI 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Fairy Tales
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PZ8.S23 LI 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Fairy Tales
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PZ8.S23 LI 2002 Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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PZ8.S23 LI 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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PZ8.S23 LI 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Fairy Tales
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PZ8.S23 LI 2002 Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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PZ8.S23 LI 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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PZ8.S23 LI 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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PZ8.S23 LI 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Fairy Tales
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Hans Christian Andersen's poignant story of a poor child trying to survive on the city streets is among the world's best-loved tales. Andersen, who grew up in the slums of Odense, Denmark, had first-hand knowledge of poverty and neglect. Drawing on his childhood experiences, he created a tale that has touched the hearts of generations. Christine San José captures the heart and lyricism of Andersen's classic in a tale "told with originality and grace," according to School Library Journal. First published in 1995, this retelling features beautiful new illustrations by Kestutis Kasparavicius.


Author Notes

Hans Christian Andersen, one of the best known figures in literature, is best know for combining traditional folk tales with his own great imagination to produce fairy tales known to most children today. The Danish writer was born in the slums of Odense. Although he was raised in poverty, he eventually attended Copenhagen University.

Although Andersen wrote poems, plays and books, he is best known for his Fairy Tales and Other Stories, written between 1835 and 1872. This work includes such famous tales as The Emperor's New Clothes, Little Ugly Duckling, The Tinderbox, Little Claus and Big Claus, Princess and the Pea, The Snow Queen, The Little Mermaid, The Nightingale, The Story of a Mother and The Swineherd.

Andersen's greatest work is still influential today, helping mold some of the works of writers ranging from Charles Dickens to Oscar Wilde and inspiring many of the works of Disney and other motion pictures.

Andersen, who traveled greatly during his life, died in his home in Rolighed on August 4, 1875.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Gr. 2-4. This striking picture book, with its smooth, able translation, presents Andersen's story of the little girl who stands out in the bitter cold on New Year's Eve, hoping to sell matches. When no one buys them, she lights her matches and sees beautiful visions in their flames. The next morning, she is found dead. Many illustrators have presented idealized visions of the match girl, which tend to sentimentalize her story, but Pacovska takes a different approach. Winner of the Hans Christian Andersen Award for illustration in 1992, the artist doesn't depict the tale realistically or emphasize its pathos; instead, she offers expressive and sometimes expressionistic pictures. Even the placement of story and illustration is unusual. The entire text appears on five pages, interspersed among 12 full- and double-page illustrations. Featuring bold colors in mixed media, silver foil elements, and cut-paper collages, the striking artwork is naive in style but sophisticated in design. Often abstract and sometimes puzzling (a giant's body with a bird's head clutching a fork), Pacovska's highly original illustrations leave plenty of space for interpretation and imagination, especially for art students. --Carolyn Phelan Copyright 2005 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

Bell (The Little Mermaid) renders Andersen's story with painful vividness, resisting the urge to draw attention to her own prose. Instead Pacovsk 's stark expressionist plates dominate the pages. An eminence grise among European illustrators, she fully exploits the media in which she works. Collages overlaid with pastel and felt-tip pen, printed on heavy, glossy stock, represent elements of the Little Match Girl's story. Her life unfolds as bold red-scribbling, terrifying chaos. Her frozen feet are white lines on black, while smaller drawings experiment with other deceptively simple ways of drawing feet and matches. A little red "WHoosh!" taped into a narrow gap between blocky, steel-gray apartment buildings indicates where she sits; later, a shooting star foretells her death. The star falls across a full-bleed spread, its path on the left page stenciled into shiny silver foil, like a lake or a mirror; the right-hand page depicts a series of pastel smudges arranged in a grid that seem to stand for the tears and dirt on the Little Match Girl's face, but also resemble an artist's palette. With smaller fragments of silver, the star strikes the heroine. Every page contains a similar shock, a moment of alienation, and yet viewers will likely feel the rightness of these images for one of Andersen's most disturbing stories. This rendering will be best suited to those who know the tale well and can appreciate this intellectual, abstract presentation. All ages. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 4‘In her retelling of the familiar tale, San José retains the story's poignancy without lapsing into sentimentality. As in her Cinderella (Boyds Mills, 1994), she demonstrates a storyteller's skill for language and pacing. Her narrative is consistent with other translations, told with originality and grace. It never becomes maudlin, and the emotions inspired by the little girl's death and transition into heaven are genuine. The moving text is perfectly matched by Archipowa's ethereal and luminous watercolor paintings. The frontispiece opposite the half-title page depicts Andersen at work, and the coziness of the scene contrasts sharply with the plight of his heroine. When the story opens, a double-spread painting depicts snow-frosted houses with windows so glowing with warmth and comfort that readers almost do not see the tiny girl huddled against a building. Archipowa makes choices rich in symbolism and her use of light conveys the mystery and magic of the tale. The pale colors emphasize the bleakness and cold in the beginning and later highlight the child's reunion with her grandmother. Make room on the shelves for this one.‘Donna L. Scanlon, Lancaster County Library, PA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.