Cover image for Chronology of the stock market
Title:
Chronology of the stock market
Author:
Wright, Russell O.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Jefferson, North Carolina : McFarland, [2002]

©2002
Physical Description:
128 pages : 23 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780786413287
Format :
Book

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HG4572 .W75 2002 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

This chronology covers early trading and the evolution of the US stock exchange, the establishment of various market indexes and the development of market regulation, and reveals how the market was affected by historical events.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Describes events from April 4, 1644, when the Dutch began building the fence that would later define Broad Street (the first permanent home of the NYSE was located at the corner of Broad Street and Wall Street) to August 2001, when Alan Greenspan cut interest rates to their lowest levels since 1993.


Choice Review

Wright, a statistical analyst, has constructed a literal chronology of the stock market, beginning on April 4, 1644, when the Dutch built a fence around lower Manhattan, and ending on August 21, 2001, when the Federal Reserve lowered interest rates for the seventh time during that year. Coverage is primarily concerned with the New York Stock Exchange. By browsing the chronology, readers can learn what happened on a particular day, e.g., May 27, 1933, when the Securities Act of 1933 was approved. The index is constructed using dates, not pages. Readers are directed to dates in the main part of the work to obtain information on a particular topic, e.g., when the Dow Jones industrial average reached 2500 (January 8, 1987) or on an event or person, e.g., President Ulysses S. Grant (September 24, 1869). The chronology favors more recent events: only four entries appear for 1940-49, but there are 20 entries for 2000. Entries range from the important to the trivial, with no obvious differentiation. This slim volume is most appropriate for general readers interested in the stock market; not a high priority for academic collections. H. Mayo The College of New Jersey


Table of Contents

Acknowledgmentsp. viii
Introductionp. 1
Chronology of the Stock Marketp. 9
Appendixp. 103
Bibliographyp. 121
Indexp. 123