Cover image for Place matters : metropolitics for the twenty-first century
Title:
Place matters : metropolitics for the twenty-first century
Author:
Dreier, Peter, 1948-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Lawrence, Kan. : University Press of Kansas, [2001]

©2001
Physical Description:
xv, 349 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780700611348

9780700611355
Format :
Book

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HV4045 .D74 2001 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

The central thesis of Place Matters is that economic segregation between rich and poor and the growing sprawl of American cities and suburbs are not solely the result of individual choices in free markets. Rather, these problems have been powerfully shaped by short-sighted government policies.


Summary

The central thesis of Place Matters is that economic segregation between rich and poor and the growing sprawl of American cities and suburbs are not solely the result of individual choices in free markets. Rather, these problems have been powerfully shaped by short-sighted government policies.


Author Notes

Peter Dreier, Dr. E.P. Clapp Distinguished Professor of Politics and director of the Urban and Environmental Policy Program at Occidental College, is coauthor of Regions That Work: How Cities and Suburbs Can Grow Together and The Next Los Angeles: The Struggle for a Livable City
John Mollenkopf is Distinguished Professor of Political Science and sociology and director of the Center for Urban Research at CUNY Graduate Center
Todd Swanstrom is professor of public policy at Saint Louis University. He is the author of The Crisis of Growth Politics: Cleveland, Kucinich, and the Challenge of Urban Populism, the coauthor of City Politics, and coeditor of Beyond the City Limits


Peter Dreier, Dr. E. P. Clapp Distinguished Professor of Politics and director of the Urban and Environmental Policy Program at Occidental College
John Mollenkopf is professor of political science and sociology and director of the Center for Urban Research at CUNY Graduate Center
Todd Swanstrom is professor of public policy at Saint Louis University


Reviews 2

Choice Review

Despite, or possibly because of, the economic prosperity of the 1990s, economic segregation in the US has become more pronounced and sprawl a renewed object of public concern. Urban poverty remains entrenched, and the cities struggle to meet the needs of their residents for jobs and public services. The inequalities of place persist. Dreier (Occidental College), Mollenkopf (CUNY Graduate Center), and Swanstrom (Saint Louis Univ.) contend the solution is to recognize the contribution that place makes to social opportunities and to respond with policies that treat metropolitan areas as integrated regions and commit the federal government to enhancing rather than harming the cities. Thoroughly documented, the argument unfolds mainly as a review of the federal, state, and local urban policy of the last 50 years and a critique of market-based perspectives on social problems and public policies. Intent on offering more than a wish list of desirable policies and premised on the notion that people who live in different places ultimately share the same fate, the authors end the book with a political strategy for building a cross-class and racially diverse coalition (centered on the Democratic Party) of suburban and city voters. No better summary exists of "progressive" thinking on urban policy. Highly recommended for upper-division undergraduate through professional collections. R. A. Beauregard New School for Social Research


Choice Review

Despite, or possibly because of, the economic prosperity of the 1990s, economic segregation in the US has become more pronounced and sprawl a renewed object of public concern. Urban poverty remains entrenched, and the cities struggle to meet the needs of their residents for jobs and public services. The inequalities of place persist. Dreier (Occidental College), Mollenkopf (CUNY Graduate Center), and Swanstrom (Saint Louis Univ.) contend the solution is to recognize the contribution that place makes to social opportunities and to respond with policies that treat metropolitan areas as integrated regions and commit the federal government to enhancing rather than harming the cities. Thoroughly documented, the argument unfolds mainly as a review of the federal, state, and local urban policy of the last 50 years and a critique of market-based perspectives on social problems and public policies. Intent on offering more than a wish list of desirable policies and premised on the notion that people who live in different places ultimately share the same fate, the authors end the book with a political strategy for building a cross-class and racially diverse coalition (centered on the Democratic Party) of suburban and city voters. No better summary exists of "progressive" thinking on urban policy. Highly recommended for upper-division undergraduate through professional collections. R. A. Beauregard New School for Social Research


Table of Contents

List of Tables and Illustrationsp. ix
Prefacep. xi
1 Place Still Mattersp. 1
2 The Facts of Economic Segregation and Sprawlp. 30
3 The Costs of Economic Segregation and Sprawlp. 56
4 The Roads Not Taken: How Federal Policy Promoted Economic Segregation and Suburban Sprawlp. 92
5 What Cities Can and Cannot Do to Address Povertyp. 133
6 Regionalisms Old and Newp. 173
7 Metropolicies for the Twenty-first Centuryp. 201
8 Crossing the City Line: A Metropolitics for the Twenty-first Centuryp. 230
Notesp. 261
Indexp. 335
List of Tables and Illustrationsp. ix
Prefacep. xi
1 Place Still Mattersp. 1
2 The Facts of Economic Segregation and Sprawlp. 30
3 The Costs of Economic Segregation and Sprawlp. 56
4 The Roads Not Taken: How Federal Policy Promoted Economic Segregation and Suburban Sprawlp. 92
5 What Cities Can and Cannot Do to Address Povertyp. 133
6 Regionalisms Old and Newp. 173
7 Metropolicies for the Twenty-first Centuryp. 201
8 Crossing the City Line: A Metropolitics for the Twenty-first Centuryp. 230
Notesp. 261
Indexp. 335