Cover image for The Declaration of Independence
Title:
The Declaration of Independence
Author:
United States.
Corporate Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Scholastic Nonfiction, [2002]

©2002
Physical Description:
160 pages : color illustrations ; 29 cm
Summary:
The text of the Declaration of Independence is accompanied by illustrations meant to help explain its meaning.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780439407007
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
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Material Type
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Status
Central Library E221 .U57 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Childrens Area
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Alden Ewell Free Library E221 .U57 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Boston Free Library E221 .U57 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Clarence Library E221 .U57 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Collins Library E221 .U57 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Concord Library E221 .U57 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Crane Branch Library E221 .U57 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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East Aurora Library E221 .U57 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Eden Library E221 .U57 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Hamburg Library E221 .U57 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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City of Tonawanda Library E221 .U57 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Williamsville Library E221 .U57 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Julia Boyer Reinstein Library E221 .U57 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Audubon Library E221 .U57 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Kenmore Library E221 .U57 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Taken phrase by phrase, inscribed and illustrated, these most famous words ring as true today as they did more than 200 years ago.

The Declaration of Independence is considered to be one of the greatest documents of all time. The central section of the declaration is a ringing assertion that every human being has an equal right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. These are the words that have built your nation and keep it strong.

Here is the complete Declaration of Independence beautifully hand-lettered and decorated. Almost every section is highlighted on its own page, with its meaning and significance enhanced by imaginative drawings and sketches appropriate to the all-important words they complement.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Gr. 4^-8. At the back of this book, the Declaration of Independence is printed just on four pages, but on the 134 pages that precede it, the same document appears, phrase by phrase in very large type on one page, with full-page drawings in ink and color washes facing it. The effect of the presentation is to enable children to slow down and consider each part of the document as a separate statement representing the views of the Founding Fathers as they broke ties with England. Deftly drawn and often light in tone, the illustrations are witty rather than comical, giving readers something to think about as well, though the tone of the text seems staid by comparison. Appendixes include a good, detailed chronology of events leading up to the document, a useful glossary of terms used in the text, and short lists of books and Web sites. The bibliography of books suggested for further reading includes eight titles, five of which were published by Scholastic. --Carolyn Phelan


Publisher's Weekly Review

Infused with humor and a contagious patriotism, newcomer Fink's visual interpretation of the Declaration of Independence will help youngsters read between the sometimes puzzling lines of this monumental document. Fink breaks up this fervent, articulate proclamation into brief, elegantly hand-lettered phrases, which he pairs with etching-like artwork that evokes the period of the document s authorship and elucidates the words meaning. As the Declaration specifies the colonists grievances against King George III, the comically hyperbolic cross-hatch illustrations depict inventive symbols for the despised British rule and a range of comical parodies of the monarch. Opposite the statement He has called together legislative bodies at places unusual, uncomfortable, and distant from the depository of their public Records is a picture of an elaborate maze, with a building atop a steep cliff at its center and a caption that reads, Enter here to get to the King s meeting place. On a spread declaring that the king is a Tyrant,... unfit to be the ruler of a free people, Fink shows an empty throne with a sign announcing Be back soon. Gone to Class in Advanced Tyranny! Geo III. And with playful anachronism, the illustrator shows Patrick Henry holding a contemporary New Hampshire license plate (bearing the slogan Live Free or Die and the tag number 1776) opposite the assertion that these United Colonies are, and of Right ought to be Free and Independent States. This clever and inspiring volume concludes with a glossary and chronology of events leading up to the drafting of the Declaration. Ages 10-up. (July) Fiction (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-8-In this truly inspired book, Fink uses lighthearted pen-and-ink and watercolor illustrations and a hand-lettered text to explain the meaning of the document, phrase by phrase. He captures the protagonists-Thomas Jefferson, along with John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, Roger Sherman, and Robert Livingston-who worked as a committee to write the Declaration. And there is a villain-England's own George III, who pretty much single-handedly, through personality, actions, and inactions, saw to it that America would revolt and sever ties with the crown. The 200-year-old words are made clear with the complementary illustrations. As an example, the wording "-it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another-" is illustrated with a pair of scissors severing a ribbon binding the Union Jack to Old Glory. And, in referring to several of George III's many misdeeds, "He has made Judges dependent on his Will alone, for the tenure of their offices-," the king is pictured as a puppet master, with a wigged judge as the puppet. There is no doubt where Fink's sympathies lie. This effort pairs nicely with Russell Freedman's Give Me Liberty! (Holiday, 2000), which delves more deeply into how and why the Declaration was written. Fink's work is a winner.-Anne Chapman Callaghan, Racine Public Library, WI (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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