Cover image for CIW - internetworking professional study guide
Title:
CIW - internetworking professional study guide
Author:
Lane, Patrick T.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
San Francisco, Calif. ; London : SYBEX, [2002]

©2002
Physical Description:
xlv, 573 pages ; : illustrations 23 cm + 1 CD-ROM (4 3/4 in.)
General Note:
Includes index.

"Exam 1DO-460"--Cover.
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780782140835
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

Here's the book you need to prepare for Exam 1D0-460, CIW Internetworking Professional.

This Study Guide provides:

In-depth coverage of official exam objectives Practical information on internetworking technologies Hundreds of challenging review questions, in the book and on the CD Leading-edge exam preparation software, including a testing engine and electronic flashcards

Authoritative coverage of all exam topics, including:

Defining the Internet infrastructure and key internetworking protocols Understanding routing processes Working with application layer protocols--HTTP, FTP, SMTP, and SNMP Analyzing BOOTP and the DHCP servers and clients Using exterior protocols and gateways Working with network troubleshooting tools Comparing and contrasting IPv4 and IPv6

Note: CD-ROM/DVD and other supplementary materials are not included as part of eBook file.


Author Notes

Patrick T. Lane is the Director of Courseware for ProsoftTraining.com. He assisted in the creation of the CIW program and the i-Accelerate program for Intel, Novell and Microsoft professionals. Rod Hauser is a Certified Information Systems Security Professional and Linux Certified Administrator with more than ten years of experience administering systems and networks.


Table of Contents

Introductionp. xxi
Assessment Testp. xxxi
Chapter 1 The Internet and TCP/IPp. 1
Networking Past and Presentp. 3
Overview of TCP/IPp. 4
TCP/IP and Interoperabilityp. 4
Internetworking and the Corporate Networkp. 5
Evolution of the Internetp. 6
Internet-Related Authoritiesp. 7
Requests for Comments (RFCs)p. 8
Reference RFCsp. 10
OSI Reference Modelp. 10
How the Layers Communicatep. 12
Packetsp. 14
Cyclic Redundancy Checkp. 15
Packet Creation: Adding Headersp. 15
Packet Creation: Removing Headersp. 16
TCP/IPp. 16
A Collection of Protocolsp. 16
An Open Standardp. 17
Internet Architecture and Protocolsp. 17
Network Access Layerp. 19
Internet Layerp. 20
Transport Layerp. 22
Application Layerp. 22
OSI/RM Protocol Examplesp. 25
Application Layer Protocolsp. 25
Transport Layer Protocolsp. 26
Network Layer Protocolsp. 26
Data-Link Layer Protocolsp. 27
Major Networking Protocols Suitesp. 27
Protocol Characteristicsp. 28
IPX/SPXp. 29
NetBEUIp. 31
AppleTalkp. 31
Data-Link Control (DLC)p. 31
Systems Network Architecture (SNA)p. 31
Multiprotocol Networksp. 32
De-multiplexingp. 32
Specialized Serial Interface Protocolsp. 33
Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP)--RFC 1661, STD 51p. 34
Serial Line Internet Protocol (SLIP)--RFC 1055, STD 47p. 35
Chapter 2 The OSI Logical and Network Access Layersp. 47
Ethernetp. 49
Determining Ethernet Addressesp. 49
Linuxp. 50
Windows 2000p. 51
Ethernet Headersp. 53
Ethernet Header Fieldsp. 53
Protocol Analyzersp. 54
Introduction to Internet Addressingp. 59
Internet Addressingp. 59
Decimal vs. Binary Formatp. 60
Internet Address Classesp. 61
Class A Addressesp. 63
Class B Addressesp. 63
Class C Addressesp. 63
Class D Addressesp. 64
Class E Addressesp. 64
IP Addressing Rulesp. 64
Broadcast Addressesp. 65
Network Addressesp. 65
Special-Case Source Addressesp. 66
Loopback Addressp. 66
Reserved IP Addressingp. 66
Address Resolution Protocolp. 67
ARP Descriptionp. 68
ARP Headerp. 69
Reverse Address Resolution Protocol (RARP)p. 73
RARP Descriptionp. 73
Address and Parameter Allocation Overviewp. 74
Bootstrap Protocol (BootP)p. 74
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP)p. 75
DHCP Relay Agentsp. 75
How DHCP Worksp. 76
DHCP Implementationp. 77
DHCP Headerp. 77
Chapter 3 Subnetting and Routingp. 103
Subnet Masksp. 105
Custom Subnet Masksp. 107
Classless Interdomain Routing (CIDR)p. 115
IP and Routingp. 117
Routingp. 122
Routing Information Tablesp. 125
Static vs. Dynamic Routingp. 126
The route Commandp. 126
The ping Commandp. 126
Routing Protocolsp. 129
Routing Information Protocol (RIP)p. 130
Open Shortest Path First (OSPF)p. 134
Exterior Gateway Protocol (EGP)p. 137
Border Gateway Protocol (BGP)p. 138
Chapter 4 Transport Layerp. 149
TCPp. 150
TCP Headerp. 151
Applications That Use TCPp. 153
TCP Negotiation Processp. 154
Establishing a TCP Connection: SYN, ACKp. 154
Terminating a TCP Connection: FIN, ACKp. 155
User Datagram Protocol (UDP)p. 159
UDP Headerp. 159
Applications That Use UDPp. 160
TCP and UDP Portsp. 160
Well-Known Port Numbersp. 161
Registered Port Numbersp. 162
Chapter 5 Domain Name Systemp. 173
The Hosts Filep. 174
DNSp. 178
DNS Hierarchyp. 178
DNS Componentsp. 181
DNS Server Typesp. 182
Root Serverp. 182
Primary or Master Serverp. 183
Secondary or Slave Serverp. 183
Caching and Chaching-Only Serverp. 184
Forwarding Serverp. 184
DNS Hierarchy Examplep. 184
DNS Recordsp. 185
Unix and DNSp. 186
named.cap. 187
named.localp. 187
domain_name.hostsp. 189
rev.domain_name.hostsp. 190
named.boot (BIND version 4)p. 190
named.conf (BIND) Version 8)p. 191
resolv.confp. 193
Windows 2000 and DNSp. 200
Dynamic DNSp. 200
Chapter 6 Troubleshooting TCP/IPp. 225
Network Filesp. 226
The protocols (Unix) and protocol (Windows 2000) Filesp. 227
The services Filep. 227
The xinetd.conf File and the /etc/xinetd.d Directoryp. 229
Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP)p. 230
Troubleshooting Network Problemsp. 233
pingp. 233
traceroutep. 235
netstatp. 236
Troubleshooting Name and Address Problemsp. 238
ifconfig (Linux)p. 239
ipconfig (Windows 2000)p. 240
arpp. 241
nslookupp. 242
hostnamep. 243
Troubleshooting Analysisp. 243
Baselinep. 243
Identifying Performance Degradationp. 251
Systemp. 252
Networkp. 252
Client/Server Applicationsp. 253
Client/Server Application Considerationsp. 254
Establishing Guidelinesp. 256
Operating System Performancep. 259
Unixp. 259
Windows 2000p. 264
Network Environmentp. 266
Duplicate IP Addressesp. 270
Chapter 7 Network Management Essentialsp. 283
Network Managementp. 284
Management Protocolsp. 285
Management Functional Areas (MFAs)p. 287
Fault Managementp. 288
Configuration Managementp. 289
Accounting Managementp. 290
Performance Managementp. 291
Security Managementp. 292
Network Management Modelp. 292
Managed Nodesp. 293
Agentsp. 293
Information Basep. 297
Network Management System (NMS)p. 298
Network Management Architecturep. 300
Centralized Architecturep. 300
Distributed Architecturep. 301
Hierarchical Architecturep. 302
Alternative Architecturesp. 302
SNMP Overviewp. 303
Popularity of SNMPp. 304
History of SNMPp. 305
SNMPv1p. 306
SNMPv2p. 307
SNMPv3p. 309
SNMP Extensionsp. 311
The Structure of Management Information (SMI)p. 311
The Object Identifierp. 312
Naming an Object: Object Identifiers and the MIB Treep. 312
Creating an MIB: Syntax and Encodingp. 313
The SNMP Processp. 314
Querying MIB Variablesp. 314
NMS-to-Agent PDUsp. 315
Agent-to-NMS PDUsp. 315
Network Discoveryp. 316
The Network Mapp. 317
The NMS Management Databasep. 317
Security and the NMS Applicationp. 317
SNMP Architecturep. 318
The SNMP Messagep. 318
SNMP and TCP/IPp. 320
UDP Ports and Communicationp. 321
Common NMS Applicationsp. 322
Agentsp. 325
Agents and Windows 2000 Serverp. 326
SNMP Agents and Unixp. 332
Agents and Internetworkingp. 333
Chapter 8 The Management Information Base and Enterprise SNMPp. 347
The MIB Treep. 348
The ISO Branchp. 349
The Internet Node and Its Childrenp. 350
MIB Terminologyp. 353
MIB-Ip. 354
MIB-IIp. 354
MIB Groupsp. 356
Groups Residing Off the Enterprises Groupp. 356
Vendor Subgroupsp. 358
Groups Residing Off the Management Groupp. 359
Accessing MIB Variablesp. 361
Accessing Simple Variablesp. 362
Accessing Array Variablesp. 362
Implementing SNMPp. 369
SNMPv1 Message Formatp. 370
GetRequestp. 370
GetNextRequestp. 371
GetResponsep. 372
SetRequestp. 373
Trapp. 374
SNMPv1 Error Messagesp. 375
SNMPv1 Drawbacksp. 376
Securityp. 376
Limited Communication Pathsp. 383
No Multiprotocol Supportp. 383
SNMPv2 and SNMPv3p. 384
Remote Network Monitoring MIB (RMON)p. 388
What Is RMON?p. 388
Defining RMONp. 389
RMON Goalsp. 390
Chapter 9 IPv6--Internals and IPv4 Comparisonp. 401
Introduction to IPv6p. 402
The Need for IPv6p. 403
Methodology for Determining Required Number of IP Addressesp. 403
History of IPv6p. 404
Candidatesp. 404
The Decisionp. 405
IPv4 vs. IPv6: Key Differencesp. 405
IPv4 Headerp. 406
IPv6 Headerp. 407
IPv4 Removed Fieldsp. 408
Fixed Format for IP Headersp. 408
No Header Checksump. 408
No Hop-by-Hop Segmentationp. 409
No Type of Service Fieldp. 409
IPv4 Revised Fieldsp. 410
Datagram Length Field, Payload Length Fieldp. 410
Protocol Field, Next Header Fieldp. 410
Time To Live (TTL) Field, Hop Limit Fieldp. 411
IPv6 New Fieldsp. 411
IPv6 Header in Detailp. 413
IPv6 Extension Headersp. 415
Hop-by-Hop Extension Headerp. 415
Destination Options Extension Headerp. 416
Routing Extension Headerp. 416
Fragment Extension Headerp. 417
IPv6 Extension Header Orderp. 418
Windows 2000 and IPv6p. 420
IPv6 Utilitiesp. 420
Linux and IPv6p. 424
Chapter 10 IPv6 Address Architecture, Routing, and Securityp. 439
IPv6 Address Architecturep. 440
Hexadecimal Numbersp. 441
IPv6 Address Abbreviationp. 444
Double-Colon Conventionp. 445
Expanding IPv6 Addressesp. 445
Address Typesp. 446
IPv6 Address Assignmentsp. 447
Aggregatable Global Unicast Addressesp. 449
Top-Level Aggregator (TLA)p. 449
Next-Level Aggregator (NLA)p. 449
Site-Level Aggregator (SLA)p. 449
Host Addressp. 450
Special Unicast Addressesp. 451
Multicast Addressesp. 452
Flagsp. 453
Scopep. 453
Group Identifierp. 453
Fixed Length vs. Variable Lengthp. 454
IPv6 Routingp. 455
CIDR to Aggregate Network Routesp. 455
Aggregatable Routing Hierarchyp. 456
Multicast Routingp. 457
IPv6 Routing Protocolsp. 459
BGPv4 to IDRPp. 459
Updating Interior Routing Protocols to Work with IPv6p. 460
IPv6 Securityp. 460
IPv6 Authenticationp. 461
IPv6 Confidentialityp. 462
Chapter 11 Migrating to IPv6p. 479
Neighbor Discovery (ND) Protocolp. 481
Internet Control Message Protocol Version 6 (ICMPv6)p. 481
ICMPv6 Headerp. 482
ICMPv6 Messagesp. 482
Plug-and-Play Autoconfigurationp. 485
Stateless Autoconfigurationp. 486
Stateful Configurationp. 490
Address Resolutionp. 491
Neighbor Solicitation Message Headerp. 492
Neighbor Advertisement Message Headerp. 493
Simple Internet Transition (SIT) Mechanismsp. 498
SIT Featuresp. 498
SIT Mechanismsp. 499
Dual IP Stacksp. 499
Dual IP Stack Supportp. 500
IPv6 Name Servicep. 500
IPv4 Address Compatibilityp. 502
IPv6-in-IPv4 Tunneling: The 6Bonep. 503
Tunneling Processp. 505
Connecting to the 6Bonep. 506
Connecting to Isolated Hostsp. 507
Glossaryp. 521
Indexp. 549